Media coverage for Planday Brexit survey

brexit

Earlier this month (12 June) the Institute partnered with workforce collaboration software company Planday to launch their YouGov survey of hospitality managers and staff to find out how prepared they are for Brexit and what impact they think it will have on their business and jobs.

The media coverage from the launch was highly successful, with a total number of 42 pieces of both online and broadcast media. Our chief executive Peter Ducker FIH took part in a total of 13 radio interviews with stations such as BBC Radio Scotland and Jazz FM, with a reach of over 2.4 million people.

There was a total of 29 pieces of editorial coverage, including Press Association, the selective newswire service which feeds the British media, alongside online coverage in the Independent.

The survey received strong pick-up across the hospitality and HR trade media, such as The CatererBig HospitalityHotel OwnerHospitality & Catering News and Boutique Hotelier, some of which included insights from the Planday Brexit Survival Guide.

The coverage did not stop at just the UK, as the research was picked up globally in the US, India, Indonesia, Germany, South Africa, France, Sweden, Portugal, and even included an article in Welsh.

All members will receive a printed copy the Brexit Survival Guide with their copy of HQ Magazine this July. The guide is packed with smart tips on recruitment, retention and staff engagement.

Download your Brexit Survival Guide here

 

 

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35 of UK’s Top 100 restaurant groups now loss-making – up 75% in just a year

  • Oversaturated market, minimum wage hike put pressure on restaurants
  • Another minimum wage rise just weeks away

35 of the UK’s Top 100 restaurant groups are now loss-making, up 75% from just 20 last year, shows research by UHY Hacker Young, the national accountancy group.
UHY Hacker Young says that trading conditions have become increasingly difficult for restaurant chains dealing with oversaturation in the market as well as rising costs.
The firm adds that this research comes on the back of the high-profile struggles of several major restaurant chains in recent weeks, including:

  • Jamie’s Italian, started by Jamie Oliver, which has closed 12 branches as part of a Company Voluntary Arrangement (CVA) to restructure its £71.5m debt
  • Byron, the burger chain, which may close up to 20 of its 67 branches following a period of paying reduced rent
  • Prezzo, the Italian chain, which is expected to close some of its 300 branches as part of a restructuring
  • Strada, another Italian chain, which closed 11 branches over the festive period
  • Barbecoa, another Jamie Oliver chain, which entered administration in mid-February
  • EAT, the sandwich chain, which was rumoured in early February to be considering closing some of its 100 branches

UHY Hacker Young says that pressures of competing with numerous similar ‘fast casual’ restaurants in an overcrowded high street are a major driver of many large restaurant groups registering losses over the past year.

It adds that the National Minimum wage, which has risen by an above-inflation 19% to £7.50 per hour over the last five years, has added a substantial cost burden to large restaurant chains. From April 2018, the minimum wage will rise even further to £7.83.

Peter Kubik, Partner at UHY Hacker Young, comments: “More than a third of the biggest companies in the restaurant sector are losing money, and there is little respite on the horizon.”

“Pressures on the restaurant sector have been building for years, and the last year has pushed a number of major groups to breaking point.”

“With Brexit hanging over consumers like a dark cloud, restaurants can’t expect a bailout from a surge in discretionary spending.”

“Consumers only have a finite amount of spending power when it comes to eating out, and the oversaturation of the market means that groups that fall foul of changing trends can very easily fail.”

“The Government has ratcheted up costs with a series of above-inflation rises in the minimum wage, and we are just weeks away from another 4.4% rise in April. That will be tough for a lot of restaurants to absorb.”

About UHY Hacker Young:

 The UHY Hacker Young Group is one of the UK’s Top 15 accountancy networks with 110 partners and more than 620 professional staff working from 22 locations around the country. The offices within the Group provide a wide range of accounting, tax and business advisory services, with a reputation for integrity and reliability within the financial community, and particularly with London’s Stock Markets. UHY Hacker Young are also ranked 15th in the ARL Corporate Advisers Rankings Guide amongst other UK audit firms for advising London Stock Exchange listed companies.

UHY Hacker Young is a founder member of the UHY International network with offices in every major financial centre in the world. Further information can be found at www.uhy-uk.com

 

Understanding the impact of Brexit on housekeeping teams. Take part in important research by People 1st

People-1st-Logo-ptpThere is still significant uncertainty about the extent to which employers will be able to recruit skilled and unskilled labour from the EU, when the UK leaves in 2019.

Businesses need time to prepare, particularly in those areas that currently rely on a high proportion of other EU workers. Anecdotally, hotel and accommodation providers are increasingly concerned about the possible impact of Brexit on housekeeping teams, given the high proportion of EU nationals currently employed in this area. A challenge facing the sector is that official figures suggests that migrant workers make up only 28% of the housekeeping workforce, which could downplay the potential impact on the sector.

We believe that the official figures significantly underestimate the number of migrant workers employed in housekeeping roles and are urgently undertaking research with hotel and accommodation providers to identify:

  • The extent to which their housekeeping teams employ migrant workers and are therefore susceptible to any restrictions imposed on recruiting EU workers post-Brexit
  • The extent to which recruitment and retention of housekeeping teams has been affected since the referendum
  • Possible ways in which employers are considering recruiting and retaining housekeeping teams post-Brexit.

The results will be shared with employers and industry organisations, as well as with government to help inform understanding about the needs of the hospitality sector in the run-up to the UK leaving the EU.

The research is being conducted by People 1st in January 2018 for release in early February. If you want to participate and share your views please contact Martin-Christian Kent on 07770733393 or martin-christian.kent@people1st.co.uk