Deliveroo announces integration with Lightspeed ePOS system

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Food delivery market leader Deliveroo and ePOS vendor Lightspeed have announced their integration. Lightspeed customers will now be able to see and process Deliveroo orders directly in their ePOS system.

The integration can help entrepreneurs easily incorporate delivery into their business plans, and will empower restaurateurs to become more efficient and increase their profits. This integration will be available to Lightspeed customers only.

An end to chaos, mistakes and extra costs

This integration is the innovation hospitality operators have been waiting for. Previously, offering food delivery meant having to deal with too many iPads behind the counter and the additional work of manually re-entering delivery orders into the ePOS. Not only was this a time-consuming and inefficient way of working, but it was also costly as most restaurants would need a full-time employee to take care of processing delivery orders. This integration solves both problems, eliminating the need for multiple tablets and ensuring that stock updates automatically.

Jerome Laredo, VP EMEA of Lightspeed, states: “At Lightspeed, we have always had a vision of a connected hospitality world and we strive to make our restaurateurs’ lives easier by providing them with the tools they need to grow their business.

We want Lightspeed to be the management hub for restaurants. This integration with Deliveroo is a great example of how we can give our customers an incredible opportunity to partake in the rapidly growing food-delivery market while making their operations a lot more efficient, and we are particularly pleased with that.”

Deliveroo is the first food-delivery company taking a step towards partnering with ePOS providers and remain enthusiastic about the possibilities the integration offers.

Mathieu de Lophem, General Manager, Deliveroo Benelux: “With the goal of helping restaurants thrive, Deliveroo is constantly innovating. Our partners have told us that integrating with their sales systems is such an important step in them being able to provide delivery services – that’s why we’re excited to partner with Lightspeed globally.

Through this partnership, we help restaurants cut out needless time inputting orders into sales systems. This allows front of staff to focus on delivering an amazing dine-in experience, while enabling restaurants to boost revenues through delivery orders.”

For restaurants and other hospitality operators the benefits are clear:

  • Staff processing delivery orders can be reallocated to front-of-house roles, improving the customer experience in store
  • Huge time saving, allowing restaurants to quickly process more orders
  • Reduced risk of errors when inputting orders, providing a better experience for customers
  • More counter space, decluttering the working space for restaurant staff

Nicholas Steiner, Lightspeed customer and owner of Yoobi in London is already using the integration. He says: “Up until now, each delivery order had to be manually transcribed from Deliveroo into Lightspeed by one of our team members. This process was laborious, and opened us up to mistakes which resulted in customers getting an incorrect order and making accurate reporting a challenge.

The integration is exactly what we needed as orders arrive into our Lightspeed system seamlessly. This now allows us to make orders quicker and with greater accuracy for our customers and allows us to have accurate reporting. Not only is the system faster for us, it has also allowed us to reduce our labor costs as at the volume of orders we had on a daily basis, we needed to employ one person just to enter orders into our system. Team is also happy as entering orders into the system all day was not very popular.”

About Lightspeed:

Lightspeed is a Business Partner of the Institute of Hospitality. It is the UK’s leading cloud-based management system for hospitality and retail. With more than 50,000 retailers and restaurant owners, Lightspeed processes over £12 billion in transactions per year in more than 100 countries. Lightspeed customers see on average a 20% increase in their sales within the first year. Lightspeed was founded in 2005, with its headquarters located in Montréal, Canada, and has offices in the Netherlands, Ottawa, New York, Ghent, Brisbane and london.

More information, please visit www.lightspeedhq.co.uk

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Dynamic pricing for restaurants?

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Bob Bob Ricard is using dynamic pricing

Some restaurants are starting to follow more closely the revenue management practices used by airlines and hotels. Dora Furman reports

Consumers are most familiar with the use of yield (or revenue) management in the travel industry, as airlines, hotels and car rental companies constantly alter rates based on revenue channel, day of booking and date of future use.

Consumers continue to be extremely savvy shoppers, adapting the way they shop, from changing the time of travel departure (“I can save £200 if I leave at 5am!”) to managing the time and place of booking. Now, they’ve got it down to a fine art.

Businesses such as Uber are leveraging similar yield management tactics, using dynamic pricing to adjust rates by the minute. What sets them apart from the airlines and hotels is the immediate need their services fulfil for customers. Although a customer can book a future journey, the service is most commonly called upon for instant use.

Interestingly, while restaurants have historically utilised yield management through tactics such as printed coupons, app-based offers via the likes of Groupon, day-of-the-week promotions and early-bird menus – the techniques are less advanced compared to what has been happening across the wider hospitality industry, reflecting a more static and less flexible pricing strategy.

The above raises the question, are restaurants leaving money on the table? Should operators be invoking a more flexible pricing structure? Additionally, should they charge a different price for the same product on different days or during different hours of the same day?

Norse restaurant in Harrogate moved to a bigger site thanks to crowdfunding
Norse in Harrogate is experimenting with variable discounts

Already popular in the US, some UK restaurant operators have recently started trialling dynamic pricing. One such example is the high-end London eatery Bob Bob Ricard, which is cutting 25% off its bill for off-peak diners, whilst independent operator, Norse, based in Harrogate, is experimenting with set discounts that vary according to the day of the week. Norse has now moved the trials on to Tock, a booking platform which enables customers to choose from a four or eight-course menu at £40 and £60 respectively – booking via two methods. The first option is to leave a £15 deposit, which is removed from the final bill. The second is a ticket-based system for diners who want to secure additional value by obtaining a table at a reduced rate and then finding a date to use it when slots are released. Advance tickets range from £25-35 for the four courses and £40-55 for the offer to try eight. Prices change based on demand, as well as by day and time.

Dora Furman is Vice President, Revenue Management Solutions
For further information about Revenue Management Solutions (RMS), visit
 www.revenuemanage.com or call 020 3755 0960

Green Earth Appeal and Lightspeed ePOS host Carbon Free Dining event

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Lightspeed ePOS and Green Earth Appeal have partnered to host the first event for Carbon Free Dining, a ground-breaking initiative aimed at introducing a more sustainable model for UK restaurants.

Under the programme, Carbon Free Dining plants a tree on behalf of a restaurant for every bill they present. Lightspeed ePOS then provides their platform to any restaurant under the initiative, subject to the number of trees a restaurant plants.

The initiative is already revolutionising the way local businesses and their customers give back to the environment in the fight against deforestation, extinction and global warming, having planted over 500,000 trees in more than 17 countries.

It has received support from three-Michelin star celebrity chef Marco Pierre White, James Martin and Gregory Marchand, who have since signed up their respective restaurants to Carbon Free Dining.

As part of the launch, Lightspeed and Green Earth Appeal are inviting the hospitality industry to Haz restaurant, East London, on 19th June, for an event focusing on how to create a sustainable restaurant model that will increase profitability by responding to the needs of today’s consumer. Members of the panel include Peter Hemingway, influencer and community manager at the Sustainable Restaurant Association (SRA), and Sandy Jarvis, sustainability advocate and Head chef of the renowned Culpeper restaurant in Shoreditch.

Lightspeed ePOS and Green Earth Appeal provide a cost-effective way for restaurants to showcase their corporate social responsibility at zero cost to the business.

Satinder Bindra, former director of communications for United Nations Environment, has been a strong advocate of the collaboration, stating, “[This is] an outstanding initiative which successfully merges the luxury of eating out with the joy of knowing we are simultaneously giving something back to nourish our planet”.

 Similarly, CEO and Founder of Lightspeed Dax Dasilva has also commented that, “Lightspeed was founded on pushing boundaries, empowering business and putting culture before code. By defining a new paradigm, we are redefining the industry. Carbon Free Dining is just one more step towards offering our ePOS partners and their customers a seamless way to achieve their own goals”.

 Register here for your free ticket here.

About Carbon Free Dining
Carbon Free Dining is a ground-breaking environmental certification programme managed by The United Nations Environment partner, Green Earth Appeal in partnership with Lightspeed. Simple to implement, Carbon Free Dining offers certification to those restaurants who demonstrate their passion for the environment. Carbon Free Dining-certified partners empower their diners to plant a tree in the developing world to counterbalance the environmental impact of their meal.
Learn more

About Lightspeed ePOS
Lightspeed ePOS is a cloud-based solution for independent restaurants and a Business Partner of the Institute of Hospitality.
Learn more

 

The remarkable rise of Starbucks in China

56 alan hepburnOur man in Shanghai, Alan Hepburn FIH, provides an analysis of Starbucks’ expansion in China, a country with no tradition of coffee-drinking. What lessons are there for other western businesses looking to break into this vast market?

Last week I was sat in the 30,000 sq ft Starbucks Shanghai Roastery, about five minutes walk from my apartment in Shanghai. I was there for a business meeting, trying to decide between Sumatran, Ethiopian or Nicaraguan, when I realised I was next to a couple of friends. After a quick chat, it occured to me that even in a city of 35 million people with change being constant and exponential, it’s a small world.

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Howard Schultz at the opening of Starbuck’s Shanghai Roastery in December 2017

I arrived here in 2000 as manager of the Portman Ritz Carlton and remember chatting with Howard Schultz when he came to open the first Starbucks in the city (Beijing opened the first one in China in 1999). I somewhat naively asked if he was planning on opening many? He looked somewhat incredulous at my ill-judged question. “We expect 100 in the first year,” he said. They now have 3,000 stores in China and are opening one every 15 hours – projecting 5,000 by 2020.

I was new to China and frankly had not observed much coffee-drinking going on. But what I had missed was … well, pretty much everything.

What Starbucks saw in China was four things: firstly the growth potential in the middle/upper middle class who want to buy an upscale Western experience.

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The floor space of a Starbucks in China is substantially bigger than in the West. People have business meetings, social gatherings, go on dates and get interviewed for jobs in China’s Starbucks. The saying here is: “The first two thirds of your cup is for enjoying, the last third is for staying.” Three quarters of all coffee drunk in China is consumed by 25-35 year olds and 99% of retail coffee sales is instant, but that will change.

Secondly, Starbucks’ growth in China shows the importance of not removing the essence of what makes you successful elsewhere, but shows how this needs to be adapted. As Roy T Bennet once said: “The past is a place of reference, not a place of residence.”

The Macha Frappuccino (220 – 440 calories depending on size) is a huge seller here. Green tea powder, loads of cream, milk and vanilla syrup and not a hint of coffee in sight. I have struggled in the past to get a simple espresso, as very few people are drinking them in China. But that will change.

The Roastery here is a modern-day F&B masterpiece with all the theatre of coffee roasting, artisan bread-making and stunning retail. But take a look at what people are consuming and it’s a lot less coffee than you might expect. But, as I say, that will change.

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The Chinese are not big coffee drinkers, but that has not been a barrier to Starbucks’ success

Thirdly, brands which understand progression from entry-level to premium do very well here. There are famous dumpling shops where you pay four different prices according to where you consume the same dumpling.

The last thing Starbucks understood was marketing. Their social media presence was well-established and generally ahead of most Western brands in China during its first decade here. The rest tried catch-up and some succeeded but most failed. Telling your brand story here needs content and context and it better be entertaining and fun. I spoke with the head of marketing for one of the world’s biggest and coolest sports fashion brands two years ago and he was telling me they had just moved into mobile platform selling. That’s like arriving today in Scotland and telling them you just invented whisky.

Sadly, many Western brands can’t grasp the speed of change and that the Chinese consumer is dynamic, developing and learning quickly. By the time many companies work out their ‘China strategy’ the market may have moved or changed.

I’ve lost count of the number of UK companies (including the famous ones) I speak to and meet with who bring a rigid ‘what made us successful in the past will determine all our action for the future’ attitude and end up closing shop, heading home and blaming China.

Don’t get mad, get prepared. Starbucks’ next Roastery opens in Milan, the home of great coffee and design.  But before we mention coals and Newcastle, I’m betting Starbucks have that well-covered too.

Alan Hepburn FIH has spent more than 30 years in Asia in the hospitality and lifestyle sector. Having run some of the world’s best hotels , he then developed, opened and operated China’s first luxury lifestyle company: the multi-award winning Three On The Bund in Shanghai. The Hepburn Group is a Shanghai/Singapore-based boutique consultancy that works with hospitality and F&B companies from the West, helping them navigate the challenges of market-entry and growth in China and Asia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The positive impact of the Royal Wedding by Neel Radia FIH, national chair, National Association of Care Catering (NACC)

Neel Radia image“The nation is gripped with Royal Wedding fever, as we prepare to celebrate the marriage of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. The NACC’s members are certainly no exception. We’ve heard from care caterers and chefs up and down the country who are putting in a tremendous amount of effort to ensure that their residents enjoy a Royal Wedding experience to remember.

As with most celebrations, food is playing a leading role. Our members are using their expertise in creating delicious, nutritious meals, suitable for a care setting, to give the elderly and vulnerable they care for a real treat.

Indoor and outdoor festivities include, for example, coverage of the wedding on televisions and large screens, street parties, wedding buffets, wedding breakfasts, Afternoon Teas and BBQs, all featuring carefully-planned, mouth-watering menus, plus beautiful lemon and elderflower cakes to match the famous couple’s wedding cake of choice.

Residents will be involved in the preparations, helping decorate venues and cupcakes, making their own fascinators and being invited to dress in their finest attire for the big day. They will also enjoy music, entertainment, quizzes, dancing, and one care home has even reported that their wedding breakfast will include life-size cardboard cut-outs of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle themselves!

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As well as enjoying delicious food, residents will benefit emotionally and socially. The Royal Wedding provides a fantastic opportunity for them to socialise with fellow residents, staff and visiting relatives and community members. I’m sure the parties will be an enthusiastic subject of conversation in the build-up to the main event and for some time after. The celebrations could also, importantly, help evoke fond memories of their own weddings and family occasions, as well as Royal Weddings of the past. I’m sure some residents will have seen many a Royal Wedding over their lifetimes, including that of Her Majesty The Queen herself!

The NACC sends the Royal couple many congratulations on their wedding day and we wish our members and their residents a wonderful weekend of festivities.”

Recruiting for a major new opening

How do you plan and execute a recruitment campaign for a high-profile new hotel business?  Directors of people development at the Principal Hotel London, Sean Wheeler MIH and Melanie Price, talk us through building up to 400 new employees from scratch

The former Russell Hotel, an iconic property in London’s Bloomsbury, re-opened on 16 April after almost two years of closure for refurbishment. (Following a deal with IHG, the hotel is due to change its name again later this year).

What happened to the Hotel Russell employees?

Melanie: The old hotel closed in July 2016, so obviously because of the period of time we were going to be closed, we had to put everyone into redundancy and they all left. We have one lady who still works for us and one individual who came back, but apart from that the rest of the team are new.

At what stage is the new opening?

Sean: We’re probably 25% there. We’ve opened 100 bedrooms but we still have 230 to open; we’ve opened the bar and coffee shop, but there is still the restaurant, the palm court afternoon tea venue, ballroom and meeting and events space to open. There’s still quite a bit to do!

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How far in advance did you plan your recruitment?

Melanie: We had a plan on paper and a plan in our minds but the project was unfortunately delayed a couple of times, which is quite normal. We probably didn’t start our mass recruitment until mid to late February. We recruited our 50-strong team of senior people a good year ago. So far we have recruited 150 people in total.

What channels do you use?

Melanie: We use the Caterer and various other sources, friends, contacts, colleagues. The initial 50 senior people were recommended to us which is important. A lot of people want to do an opening. They’ve read the publicity about the investment and the refurbishment. Our culture and the type of person we recruit is important to us.

For our front-line staff, we did a social media campaign which we found very useful. We’re proud that we probably only recruited half a dozen through agencies.

Sean: We only started the social media campaign in January. In three months we reached 420,000 people and managed to get 14,000 click-throughs to the vacancy page. We targeted the different groups of people we were trying to reach: people working in restaurants, bars, coffee shops, hotels, also some independent restaurants. We work with a company that helps us target certain youth groups.

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What kind of people have you recruited?

Melanie: We’ve got a real mixture. In our coffee shop you’re going to get a much more casual look in there, quite quirky people. They’ve got tattoos, different hairstyles, their uniform is a denim shirt. But then in the Palm Court we have a much more formal look. We’re really proud that we’ve got a real mixture, very diverse. We made sure we recruited for each outlet and that that the people are right for the outlet.

Sean: One of our values is ‘local at heart’ so one of the key things for us is connecting with the local community. In Bloomsbury, that is a very mixed group, so we have the coffee shop, the cocktail bar and the afternoon tea venue. We are trying to attract different types of guests at different times of the day and match the employees to the different types of clientele.

Melanie: Another of our values is warmth and we are particularly keen to make sure the team are warm and welcoming. We have looked outside the box. Some people we have given an opportunity to. They may not necessarily have all the right experience, but they’ve got the personality and warmth. We have some real characters working for us with some interesting backgrounds.

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Was exhibiting at the Passion4Hospitality Careers Fair useful to you?

Melanie: We got one or two concrete leads. Obviously a lot of it is about getting our name out there, so events like that are important. This is our only hotel in London. We have been mainly northern-based so we really have to go out there and establish ourselves and also remind people that we are changing from what the hotel was before.

Is it just people already working you recruit? How about school leavers or graduates?

We have good relationships with schools, colleges and universities. We’re very much open to people with different skills. For them to further develop their careers, it’s more about their culture and personality.

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What happens now?

Melanie: We will have 400 staff once completely open. That shouldn’t be reached until September 2019. We are very hopeful that all our revenues are going to be absolutely fantastic and we’re very positive about that. We will take on another 100 staff before the end of May. It is something we need to do gradually because we are only getting our rooms back gradually. We have another five floors to come back. Having 400 staff walk through the door all at the same time would be very difficult to manage. We make sure everyone goes through their two-day induction, they get re-training, and that training continues on their journey with us.

Sean: We’ve had a lot of great comments on trip advisor about our people. Our values are generous, intuitive, warm, distinctive, and local at heart. The team are actively recruiting for these values. Melanie has done a great job to find so many people who have these values, and she has done it in a very short space of time.

Do you do face-to-face interviews or something more rapid?

Melanie: In the early days with the senior team, we did one-to-one interviews.  We’ve had a lot of open days since. Everyone will always see a member of the people development team and the head of their department. We’ve done that with every person that we have offered positions to. It’s making sure we’re comfortable. It’s about the future candidate meeting more than one person. We think that’s a useful benefit for them.

Interview by Ben Walker AIH

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Emirati and Italian Architects win Second Annual Bespoke Access Award to Champion Accessible Hospitality

Robin Sheppard, Baroness Celia Thomas, Maher Hadid (MnM Studio Architects)web res
Robin Sheppard, Baroness Celia Thomas, Maher Hadid (MnM Studio Architects)

At the second annual special event held at the Palace of Westminster on April 18th, MnM Studio Architects, along with Maria Brighenti and Marcello D’Orsi, were announced the joint winners of the 2017/18 Bespoke Access Awards, a design competition to create accessible solutions, run in association with the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and featuring a prize fund of £30,000.

MnM Studio devised an innovative accommodation solution based around the four senses of smell, taste, sound and sight, with extensive use of Braille throughout. Termed “empathy through aesthetics”, the system aims to support the emotional state of the guest, while maintaining a distinct visual appeal via a stylish, curved design.

“’Empathy through aesthetics’ perfectly encapsulates what we are aiming to do with the Access initiative”, commented Baroness Celia Thomas, Chair of the Judging Panel and Patron of the Awards. “The emphasis placed on the emotional state of the guest was particularly impressive, given this is an area that is often overlooked.”

Alongside MnM Studio, freelance Italian architects Maria Brightei and Marcello D’Orsi were successful in the Architectural category, as well as being announced joint winners of the overall Celia Thomas Prize, worth a total of £20,000. Their design, which focused on the means through which existing accommodation can be renovated with the disabled traveler in mind, concentrated on the public spaces of hotels, and how subtle enhancements can be made to significantly increase the ease with which they are passed through.

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Robin Sheppard, Baroness Celia Thomas, Marcello D’Orsi

“I was particularly struck by the attention they had paid to the customer journey through reception and the lobby areas”, commented Alan Stanton, Stirling Prize-winning architect and member of the Judging Panel. “These are areas often overlooked by both architects and business owners alike, and it is easy to think of them as merely transient. But they can significantly improve or disrupt a guest’s experience, so it was exciting to see them highlighted and approached with such care.”

“The architectural community across the country has really embraced the Access Awards since their launch in 2016”, added Jane Duncan, RIBA Immediate Past President. “It is tremendously encouraging for the future of accessible tourism to see this year’s awards attracting interest from around the world, as well as ideas shining a light on some of the more often-overlooked aspects of disabled travel.”

The competition attracted submissions spanning the length and breadth of the UK, as well as from across Europe and Asia. Entrants competed across an expanded range of categories, including Product Design, Architecture, Service Applications (Digital) and Service Applications (Training). Alongside the overall Celia Thomas Prize, worth £20,000 and believed to be the largest cash prize in the UK for a design concept.

“We were extremely pleased to see the competition attracting a truly global roster of entrants this year”, said Robin Sheppard FIH, Chairman of Bespoke Hotels and recently appointed Hotel Sector Champion for Disabled People. “The Access Awards continue to grow and evolve, but the high quality of entries ensures our collective focus remains on improving the experience for all hotel guests, whether disabled or otherwise.”

The entries were judged at the turn of the year by a panel which included Paralympic gold medalist Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, Stirling Prize-winning architect Alan Stanton, Baroness Celia Thomas, Tom Perry, Head of the Cities Programme at the Design Council, Graeme Whippy, Disability Specialist for Channel Four, Alastair Hignell CBE, alongside Robin Sheppard.

Full list of winners:
MnM Studio Architects, Dubai
Joint Winners of the Celia Thomas Prize

Maria Brighenti with Marcello D’Orsi, Italy
Joint Winners of the Celia Thomas Prize

MnM Studio Architects, Dubai
Joint Winners of the Architecture Category

Maria Brighenti with Marcello D’Orsi, Italy
Joint Winners of the Architecture Category

Wilson Mason LLP, Lancashire
Winners of the Product Design Category

Purcell, London
Winners of the Service Applications (Training) Category

Neatebox Ltd, London
Winners of Service Applications (Digital) Category

Full list of judges:
Robin Sheppard, Chairman, Bespoke Hotels Group
Celia, Baroness Thomas of Winchester, House of Lords
Alan Stanton OBE, Stanton Williams
Tanni, Baroness Grey-Thompson, Paralympic Gold Medallist, House of Lords
Graeme K Whippy MBE, Disability Specialist for Channel 4
Alastair Hignall CBE, Trustee of the Leonard Cheshire Foundation
Tom Perry, Head of the Cities Programme at the Design Council
Sarah Weir OBE, Chief Executive of Design Council
Paul Gregory, MCIBSE, MSLL, Global Specification Director for Dyson.

www.bespokehotels.com/access
#BespokeAccess