One third of hospitality sector unaware of GDPR

PrintA survey[1] conducted by Lolly, the EPoS and payment solution specialist, and The Institute of Hospitality suggests that one third (33 per cent) of the hospitality sector is still unaware of the upcoming GDPR legislation, which comes into force on 25 May 2018.

EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is intended to strengthen and unify data protection for all individuals within the European Union. It aims primarily to give control back to citizens  over their personal data and to simplify the regulatory environment.[2]

The survey also uncovered that nearly three quarters (73 per cent) of those surveyed wouldn’t know what to do if customers requested details of the data being held about them. And half (50 per cent) of respondents said they were not aware of how their methods of personal data processing will be impacted under the new regulations.

Four out of ten respondents were unsure as to whether their operational data is safely backed up. However, on a more encouraging note, more than half (57 per cent) of hospitality providers are confident in the systems they have in place.

Peter Moore, CEO of Lolly, said: “A number of the findings uncovered in the survey are alarming given organisations of every size are going to be affected by the GDPR legislation. This will include small hospitality providers with fewer in-house legal and IT resources.”

“GDPR is only around the corner. It is time to take action and get to grips with your data – before it becomes too late. The fines are high, up to €20m or up to four per cent of the annual worldwide turnover, whichever is greater.[3]

Peter Ducker FIH, chief executive at the Institute of Hospitality, added: “Getting ready for GDPR is a good opportunity for operators to spring-clean their databases.  There is a tendency in organisations to hoard data and you will probably be surprised by how much data you hold – about customers, employees and suppliers – that is old, out-of-date or of no benefit to the business at all. That’s the first step. Then it’s a question of getting in touch with your customers and asking for their consent to be contacted. It is an opportunity to forge a new and more meaningful relationship with them.”

In order to get ready for GDPR, companies must:

  • Review the types of personal data currently held on file (paper, audio or digital formats);
  • Identify lawful grounds for collecting the data;
  • Identify how the data can be kept correct and up-to-date;
  • Identify redundant or erroneous data to cull, and
  • Make a plan as to how ALL of this data is going to be kept secure.

About Lolly
Lolly is a Point of Sale (PoS) specialist serving small businesses across the UK in the hospitality industry; from coffee shops, pubs and night clubs, to mobile catering, pop ups and corporate caterers.

The company offers a complete point of sale package where customers can use its EPoS software on tills and PoS tablets. Lolly then networks these to card payment machines, to speed up service and provides a cloud-based back office, supplying real-time business analytics. The tills and software are designed to help businesses with their bottom line.

In February 2017, Lolly launched LollyPoS – the first Windows-based downloadable EPoS with integrated payment processing. The solution is designed to provide a simple, efficient and dependable point of sale solution anytime, anywhere.

Lolly provides enterprise level EPoS to hospitality and retail SMEs at an affordable price. Today, it is the only UK business of its kind that can truly scale from a downloadable product to a fully connected real-time network of tills, powered by an enterprise-level inventory reporting management system.

Find Lolly online:

Website| www.itslolly.com

Facebook| www.facebook.com/LollyLtd

Twitter| https://twitter.com/Its_Lolly_Ltd

[1] The survey opened on 3rd October 2017, 120 hospitality sector respondents

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Data_Protection_Regulation

[3] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Data_Protection_Regulation#Data_breaches

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Bright future for hospitality management graduates, says Institute of Hospitality Student Learning & Development Forum 2017

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Eleni Michael AIH and Dana Kanibolotska AIH told the Forum how the Institute had helped their management careers get off to a flying start.

Hospitality management students from across the UK attending the Institute of Hospitality’s 12th Student Learning & Development Forum gained vital insights into the exciting career paths ahead of them. The Forum included a special focus on the importance of diversity in the workplace.

The fully-booked event (15 November) was entitled “The Future is Now.” In his introduction, London Branch chair Paul Evans FIH said: “The future belongs to millennials and generation z. At the Institute of Hospitality London Branch, 40% of our organising committee is under 30 and a similar percentage are female. The hospitality industry is booming. In London, there are 8,000 new bedrooms opening this year, plus 3,500 in the rest of the UK. This growth presents an amazing opportunity to forge a great career. Our industry needs accountants, chefs, digital marketing experts, lawyers, revenue managers and HR managers.”

Next on stage,  two recent graduates described how involvement with the Institute of Hospitality had assisted them in making the right career choices. Eleni Michael AIH was invited to join the Institute’s London Branch Organising Committee when she attended last year’s L&D Forum. She went on to help Michael Voigt FIH MI organise the Institute’s Careers Fair in May 2017.  She was also inspired by the ethos and style of Firmdale Hotels while attending last year’s Forum which took place at the group’s Ham Yard Hotel in Soho. A recent graduate from the University of Surrey, she is now at the start of a two-year management trainee programme with Firmdale Hotels based at its Charlotte Street property.

Dana Kanibolotska AIH is another London Branch committee member and a recent graduate from Oxford Brookes University. She said: “The Institute of Hospitality networking and learning events that I attended as a student had a great impact on my personal and professional development, and allowed me to progress in my career at such an early stage.”

Following work placements at The Savoy and the Mandarin Oriental in London and an exchange at the Burgundy Business School in France to improve her accounting and business knowledge, Kanibolotska is currently head receptionist at the Old Bank Hotel, a 42-bedroom boutique property in Oxford.

Nearly 250 students attended the Forum from  the Edge Hotel School, Oxford BrookesUniversity, Glion Institute of Higher Education, University of West London, Westminster Kingsway College, Bournemouth University, Coventry University, Anglia Ruskin University, Norwich City College and University of Sunderland.

24607106248_e18cae3dcf_oThe inspirational speakers and panelists were:
Alistair Storey OBE FIH, president of the Institute of Hospitality and chairman and chief executive of WSH;
Michael Voigt FIH MI, general manager, L’Oscar London;
Tony Fleming, executive chef L’Oscar London;
Sean Wheeler, Group HR, Principal Hotels;
Rafael Bejerano FIH MI, director AB Hotels;
Giovanni Valentini, head of operations of hotel services for the TLC Group;
Josh Light, HR director, The Curtain Hotel, London;
Jessica Berry, talent manager, The Doyle Collection;
Josh Craddock, sales & marketing director, The Doyle Collection;
Serena von der Heyde, owner, The Georgian House Hotel;
Gregory Hall MIH, committee member Institute of Hospitality London Branch and operations manager, Elior UK;
Mary-Jane Flanagan, founder of MJ Inspire
PJ Kenny, general manager, The Hoxton, London;
Jula Fowler, human resources manager, L’Oscar London;
Antony Woodcok, managing director, Gig;
Robert Nadler, founder of Nadler Hotels.

The Institute of Hospitality London Branch Student Learning & Development Forum 2017 was generously sponsored by the venue, the Bloomsbury Hotel, part of the Doyle Collection; Preferred Hotels & Resorts; Gig; Graphico Printing and NS International.

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Who will be judging the Restaurant Manager of the Year 2018?

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As the closing date for entries into the Restaurant Manager of the Year approaches, we reveal who will be judging the final in January 2018. We are delighted to reveal three new judges who will help find the next big name in hospitality. Romain Pottier from Rhubarb, Paul Hurren FIH from Lusso and the current title holder, Matthew Mawtus from Pollen Street Social join an already prestigious list of names. John Cousins will be the chair of judges for the final and joining him on the expert panel is: –

  • Alper Zan
  • Rory Kelly-Naughton
  • Stephane Davaine
  • Chantelle Nicholson
  • Johanna Wimmer
  • Ian Sturrock
  • Ludovic Solmi
  • Roy Sommer

What will the judges be looking for to find their next winner? What does it take to be a good restaurant manager? And why should you enter? We caught up with some of the judges to find out more.

Roy Sommer, Chairman of the F&B Managers Association commented: “The Restaurant manager of the Year award highlights the great talent in our industry. Its history has shown many deserved winners from all backgrounds. This award is about the overall package and shows that it doesn’t matter if you work for one of the best hotels in the UK, or for a high street chain. To be an award-winning restaurant manager you need to have everything under control, remain calm, guide your team through service and ensure that guests have the best possible experience. And if they don’t, it’s how restaurant managers deal with the situation that makes them stand out. For those considering entering, there is nothing to be afraid of. You will take away a lot from the day itself which will help you in your career. Previous winners have included people from contract catering, high street and Michelin restaurants, private members clubs and hotels. Everyone has as much chance as each other to take this title.”

Rory Kelly-Naughton, hotels divisional manager at Evolve Hospitality said: “This is a great opportunity for a UK restaurant manager to show their skills and knowledge to the wider hospitality industry. I am going to be looking for someone with personality, the ability to interact with everyone and a positive attitude. To be a great restaurant manager you must have an ability to cope under pressure, a logical mind set and a great sense of humour. I have been involved in this competition for five years and I have enjoyed seeing how it has developed and how the winners have done in their careers, I look forward to discovering who will take the title next. To anyone who enters the competition, my advice would be to enjoy the experience, make connections with your competitors and judges, be yourself and have fun.”

Reflecting back on his success in 2016, Matthew Mawtus, general manager at Pollen Street Social added: “To be a great restaurant manager you need to know your business inside out, have complete product knowledge, show fairness and a desire to motivate and develop staff, whilst always engaging with your guests. As a judge I am going to be looking for confidence, clarity, warmth, personality and enthusiasm but above all, a genuine love of hospitality.”

Alper Zan, operations manager and hospitality consultant, won the title in 2014 and so he has seen this competition from both sides. He told us: “This is a really special award for our industry because it provides an opportunity to recognise, learn and celebrate the success of front of house managers. It can help influence the next generation as they discover how the UK’s leading managers adapt to exceed guest expectations and help their teams develop. Hospitality is a way of life for me and not just a job. I believe we need to do more to champion front of house service and restaurant managers in our country. It is a privilege to support, learn and influence people who have devoted their life to serve others.”

Romain Pottier, director of restaurants at Rhubarb was delighted to be asked to judge the award this year. He said: “This award provides a great opportunity for talented individuals to challenge themselves in front of a panel of experienced and senior industry experts. It sets the standard of what is expected from a restaurant manager nowadays, exposing them to all areas of our wonderful industry. I will be looking for a natural ability to lead and influence people in a positive way. Candidates must be very well groomed, articulate and clearly passionate about the art of hospitality.”

Restaurant mangers have until the 24th November 2017 to enter this award and the entry form can be completed online at http://www.restaurantmanageroftheyear.co.uk/enter/.
To enter, managers must answer three questions as well as submitting a CV and reference.  The best candidates will compete in a final on Monday 8th January 2018.

 

HQ Magazine Autumn 2017 out now

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Your autumn edition of HQ Magazine has arrived in the UK and been dispatched to the rest of the world. It is available to view on our website now.

In this issue, our cover feature is on how to close the gender gap in hospitality. Globally, 70% of hospitality and tourism workers are female, and yet men hold the vast majority of management and board positions.

More women than men gain university degrees and women earn more than men early in their careers. But the situation starts to reverse when people get into their mid-thirties. Sometimes the pay gap appears because women take time off to have children. Sometimes they get ‘stuck’ at a particular level.

Tracey Fairclough MIH presents brand-new research based upon interviews with 100 women from our sector and, most importantly, provides a new road map towards achieving greater equality.

We report from an Institute of Hospitality roundtable discussion of GDPR and present the best ways to prepare for the new data protection laws that come into force in May 2018. Our participants found that GDPR is actually a good opportunity to spring-clean their data and re-think their marketing strategies.

Other topics covered this autumn include preparing chefs for the open kitchen environment, job-jumping and what it means for career progression and the new health-conscisousness sweeping through hospitality.

Editor Ben Walker AIH says: “I am encouraged to see so many of our members taking the initiative to get in touch and contribute excellent articles to the magazine. The majority of our magazine is generated by members for members. My warmest thanks go to all of our marvellous contributors. A big thank you also to our designer Miranda Willan at H2O Publishing for an especially eye-catching cover.”

Members can view the magazine by logging into the members’ area of our website.

If you are not a member, please join the Institute of Hospitality now to receive your copy of HQ Magazine.
Here is a free download from the current issue:

Report from Institute of Hospitality Roundtable on GDPR

 

 

 

 

Institute of Hospitality acquires Academy of Food & Wine Service and Hospitality & Leisure Manpower

The Institute of Hospitality has made two important acquisitions: The Academy of Food & Wine Service and Hospitality & Leisure Manpower.

 The Institute’s chief executive Peter Ducker FIH explains how these businesses will fit into the Institute’s strategic plans regarding customer service and productivity.

“For 30 years the Academy of Food & Wine Service has provided training programmes, offering a pathway to management for those working in front-of-house service. It has run some important industry competitions and provided support to its members as the professional body for front-of-house food & beverage service.”

“Given our increased focus on training and the development of our own online training using the Upskill People platform, this acquisition gives us a tremendous wealth of training material which will be of tremendous value to the industry, both in the UK and overseas.”

Hospitality and Leisure Manpower (HALM) is a national training, research and consulting group, founded and managed by David Battersby OBE FIH, a former president of the Institute of Hospitality and co-founder of the Gold Service Scholarship. HALM has developed algorithms to benchmark productivity in hospitality.

In 2001, with the British Hospitality Association, Battersby launched the ‘Profit Through Productivity’ programme with backing from the Government and key trade associations. ‘Profit Through Productivity’ provided regional workshops across the UK to help businesses increase their profits and efficiency.

Ducker adds: “Given the pressures of wage inflation and the concerns associated with recruiting and retaining talent, this acquisition will enable us to help members identify opportunities within their businesses, and will also give us a service of value to the industry at large, worldwide.”

Institute chairman Stephen Kyjak-Lane FIH MI comments:

“In 2018 the Institute celebrates its 80th anniversary. These strategic acquisitions, combined with advances the Institute is making on a number of fronts demonstrate clearly that we are as important and relevant to the industry today as ever. Over the coming months you will see these two organisations re-emerge, delivering valuable support to our great industry.”

 The two organisations were previously owned by the British Institute of Innkeeping.

Take part in the Institute of Hospitality Brexit survey

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It is almost six months since the EU referendum result. The most evident impact so far has been the pound sterling devaluation. A weakened currency boosted leisure visits to the UK with an influx of visitors in July and August.

On the other hand, the pound devaluation has made international travel more expensive for UK residents. This has impacted countries in Europe that rely on arrivals from the UK, particularly Spain and Ireland.

What is your experience? Has it affected your costs and your retention and recruitment of staff? Please take a few minutes to complete our survey on the impact that Brexit has had on you and your business so far.

We know how busy you are, so this survey is very short and it is confidential. The results will be aggregated and reported on our website and in our magazine. Your participation is much appreciated.

Please complete our quick survey by clicking here.

The Institute helps shape ‘The Future of Hospitality’

The Institute was delighted to contribute to a major news supplement ‘The Future of Hospitality’ distributed with The Times on 22 September.

The supplement includes extensive quotes from our chief executive Peter Ducker FIH and exclusive data and research from our publication Spotlight on Hospitality 2016.

Among a series of thought-provoking articles on modern dining trends, Brexit, Airbnb, data analysis, technology and corporate hospitality, Ducker highlights how hospitality is deeply woven into the very fabric of our society and how organisational culture and better work/life balance can increase staff retention.

The supplement quotes our Spotlight on Hospitality 2016 report which says that while about 30% of hospitality employers have policies in place to support work/life balance, the increase in staff retention form these companies is about 80% higher than those who do not.

In an article on Brexit, Ducker puts the current situation in context and suggests that with the right long-term approach, the downsides of Brexit may be avoided altogether

“We know about our staff shortages and hear from friends and relatives that the thought of a graduate debt of £40,000 is putting some young people off taking the university route. We also know that the impending Apprentice Levy is exercising the thoughts and training strategies of many businesses, and the rationale behind apprentice programmes is now more compelling.”

Download a PDF of ‘The Future of Hospitality’