One third of hospitality sector unaware of GDPR

PrintA survey[1] conducted by Lolly, the EPoS and payment solution specialist, and The Institute of Hospitality suggests that one third (33 per cent) of the hospitality sector is still unaware of the upcoming GDPR legislation, which comes into force on 25 May 2018.

EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) is intended to strengthen and unify data protection for all individuals within the European Union. It aims primarily to give control back to citizens  over their personal data and to simplify the regulatory environment.[2]

The survey also uncovered that nearly three quarters (73 per cent) of those surveyed wouldn’t know what to do if customers requested details of the data being held about them. And half (50 per cent) of respondents said they were not aware of how their methods of personal data processing will be impacted under the new regulations.

Four out of ten respondents were unsure as to whether their operational data is safely backed up. However, on a more encouraging note, more than half (57 per cent) of hospitality providers are confident in the systems they have in place.

Peter Moore, CEO of Lolly, said: “A number of the findings uncovered in the survey are alarming given organisations of every size are going to be affected by the GDPR legislation. This will include small hospitality providers with fewer in-house legal and IT resources.”

“GDPR is only around the corner. It is time to take action and get to grips with your data – before it becomes too late. The fines are high, up to €20m or up to four per cent of the annual worldwide turnover, whichever is greater.[3]

Peter Ducker FIH, chief executive at the Institute of Hospitality, added: “Getting ready for GDPR is a good opportunity for operators to spring-clean their databases.  There is a tendency in organisations to hoard data and you will probably be surprised by how much data you hold – about customers, employees and suppliers – that is old, out-of-date or of no benefit to the business at all. That’s the first step. Then it’s a question of getting in touch with your customers and asking for their consent to be contacted. It is an opportunity to forge a new and more meaningful relationship with them.”

In order to get ready for GDPR, companies must:

  • Review the types of personal data currently held on file (paper, audio or digital formats);
  • Identify lawful grounds for collecting the data;
  • Identify how the data can be kept correct and up-to-date;
  • Identify redundant or erroneous data to cull, and
  • Make a plan as to how ALL of this data is going to be kept secure.

About Lolly
Lolly is a Point of Sale (PoS) specialist serving small businesses across the UK in the hospitality industry; from coffee shops, pubs and night clubs, to mobile catering, pop ups and corporate caterers.

The company offers a complete point of sale package where customers can use its EPoS software on tills and PoS tablets. Lolly then networks these to card payment machines, to speed up service and provides a cloud-based back office, supplying real-time business analytics. The tills and software are designed to help businesses with their bottom line.

In February 2017, Lolly launched LollyPoS – the first Windows-based downloadable EPoS with integrated payment processing. The solution is designed to provide a simple, efficient and dependable point of sale solution anytime, anywhere.

Lolly provides enterprise level EPoS to hospitality and retail SMEs at an affordable price. Today, it is the only UK business of its kind that can truly scale from a downloadable product to a fully connected real-time network of tills, powered by an enterprise-level inventory reporting management system.

Find Lolly online:

Website| www.itslolly.com

Facebook| www.facebook.com/LollyLtd

Twitter| https://twitter.com/Its_Lolly_Ltd

[1] The survey opened on 3rd October 2017, 120 hospitality sector respondents

[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Data_Protection_Regulation

[3] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Data_Protection_Regulation#Data_breaches

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Who will be judging the Restaurant Manager of the Year 2018?

RMOY 2018 logo copy (4)
As the closing date for entries into the Restaurant Manager of the Year approaches, we reveal who will be judging the final in January 2018. We are delighted to reveal three new judges who will help find the next big name in hospitality. Romain Pottier from Rhubarb, Paul Hurren FIH from Lusso and the current title holder, Matthew Mawtus from Pollen Street Social join an already prestigious list of names. John Cousins will be the chair of judges for the final and joining him on the expert panel is: –

  • Alper Zan
  • Rory Kelly-Naughton
  • Stephane Davaine
  • Chantelle Nicholson
  • Johanna Wimmer
  • Ian Sturrock
  • Ludovic Solmi
  • Roy Sommer

What will the judges be looking for to find their next winner? What does it take to be a good restaurant manager? And why should you enter? We caught up with some of the judges to find out more.

Roy Sommer, Chairman of the F&B Managers Association commented: “The Restaurant manager of the Year award highlights the great talent in our industry. Its history has shown many deserved winners from all backgrounds. This award is about the overall package and shows that it doesn’t matter if you work for one of the best hotels in the UK, or for a high street chain. To be an award-winning restaurant manager you need to have everything under control, remain calm, guide your team through service and ensure that guests have the best possible experience. And if they don’t, it’s how restaurant managers deal with the situation that makes them stand out. For those considering entering, there is nothing to be afraid of. You will take away a lot from the day itself which will help you in your career. Previous winners have included people from contract catering, high street and Michelin restaurants, private members clubs and hotels. Everyone has as much chance as each other to take this title.”

Rory Kelly-Naughton, hotels divisional manager at Evolve Hospitality said: “This is a great opportunity for a UK restaurant manager to show their skills and knowledge to the wider hospitality industry. I am going to be looking for someone with personality, the ability to interact with everyone and a positive attitude. To be a great restaurant manager you must have an ability to cope under pressure, a logical mind set and a great sense of humour. I have been involved in this competition for five years and I have enjoyed seeing how it has developed and how the winners have done in their careers, I look forward to discovering who will take the title next. To anyone who enters the competition, my advice would be to enjoy the experience, make connections with your competitors and judges, be yourself and have fun.”

Reflecting back on his success in 2016, Matthew Mawtus, general manager at Pollen Street Social added: “To be a great restaurant manager you need to know your business inside out, have complete product knowledge, show fairness and a desire to motivate and develop staff, whilst always engaging with your guests. As a judge I am going to be looking for confidence, clarity, warmth, personality and enthusiasm but above all, a genuine love of hospitality.”

Alper Zan, operations manager and hospitality consultant, won the title in 2014 and so he has seen this competition from both sides. He told us: “This is a really special award for our industry because it provides an opportunity to recognise, learn and celebrate the success of front of house managers. It can help influence the next generation as they discover how the UK’s leading managers adapt to exceed guest expectations and help their teams develop. Hospitality is a way of life for me and not just a job. I believe we need to do more to champion front of house service and restaurant managers in our country. It is a privilege to support, learn and influence people who have devoted their life to serve others.”

Romain Pottier, director of restaurants at Rhubarb was delighted to be asked to judge the award this year. He said: “This award provides a great opportunity for talented individuals to challenge themselves in front of a panel of experienced and senior industry experts. It sets the standard of what is expected from a restaurant manager nowadays, exposing them to all areas of our wonderful industry. I will be looking for a natural ability to lead and influence people in a positive way. Candidates must be very well groomed, articulate and clearly passionate about the art of hospitality.”

Restaurant mangers have until the 24th November 2017 to enter this award and the entry form can be completed online at http://www.restaurantmanageroftheyear.co.uk/enter/.
To enter, managers must answer three questions as well as submitting a CV and reference.  The best candidates will compete in a final on Monday 8th January 2018.

 

Institute of Hospitality acquires Academy of Food & Wine Service and Hospitality & Leisure Manpower

The Institute of Hospitality has made two important acquisitions: The Academy of Food & Wine Service and Hospitality & Leisure Manpower.

 The Institute’s chief executive Peter Ducker FIH explains how these businesses will fit into the Institute’s strategic plans regarding customer service and productivity.

“For 30 years the Academy of Food & Wine Service has provided training programmes, offering a pathway to management for those working in front-of-house service. It has run some important industry competitions and provided support to its members as the professional body for front-of-house food & beverage service.”

“Given our increased focus on training and the development of our own online training using the Upskill People platform, this acquisition gives us a tremendous wealth of training material which will be of tremendous value to the industry, both in the UK and overseas.”

Hospitality and Leisure Manpower (HALM) is a national training, research and consulting group, founded and managed by David Battersby OBE FIH, a former president of the Institute of Hospitality and co-founder of the Gold Service Scholarship. HALM has developed algorithms to benchmark productivity in hospitality.

In 2001, with the British Hospitality Association, Battersby launched the ‘Profit Through Productivity’ programme with backing from the Government and key trade associations. ‘Profit Through Productivity’ provided regional workshops across the UK to help businesses increase their profits and efficiency.

Ducker adds: “Given the pressures of wage inflation and the concerns associated with recruiting and retaining talent, this acquisition will enable us to help members identify opportunities within their businesses, and will also give us a service of value to the industry at large, worldwide.”

Institute chairman Stephen Kyjak-Lane FIH MI comments:

“In 2018 the Institute celebrates its 80th anniversary. These strategic acquisitions, combined with advances the Institute is making on a number of fronts demonstrate clearly that we are as important and relevant to the industry today as ever. Over the coming months you will see these two organisations re-emerge, delivering valuable support to our great industry.”

 The two organisations were previously owned by the British Institute of Innkeeping.

Summer edition of HQ Magazine

web resThe summer issue of HQ Magazine will be arriving in the post shortly.  Our main cover story takes a spin around the globe in a celebration of our international community of members.

From the mountains of Iraq to the beaches of Bangladesh, from the bright lights of Vegas to the dark waters of the North Sea, the Institute of Hospitality has passionate and dynamic members working in every imaginable location across the world.

In other features, participants in our recent roundtable discussion on Brexit and recruitment found creative ways to combat the reduction in available EU workers. Read the article here.

We also have informative and practical articles about raising money via crowdfunding platforms and how to employ home-based workers. Who knew that more than half of travel agents in the US work from home?

HQ Magazine comes out four times a year and is posted to members of the Institute of Hospitality and also available to read online. To receive your magazine become a member of the Institute of Hospitality or subscribe by emailing: subscriptions@instituteofhospitality.org

Here is a summary of this issue’s contents. A big thank you to all of our contributors.

  • Stewart McKenzie FIH on the real satisfactions to be found in a healthcare catering career
  • Adam Rowledge FIH SJS says more collaboration between industry, students and educators will benefit our industry at large
  • Alexander Wilson MIH reflects on the long-lasting benefits of mentoring relationships
  • Institute of Hospitality Awards 2017. Four Seasons Hotel London at Park Lane won Talent Development Team of the Year. Meet all our winners
  • Hospitality Assured Awards 2017. Best UK newcomer is EMCOR UK on Three. Find out who else won these prestigious awards
  • Brexit and recruitment. Our roundtable participants find creative ways to combat the reduction in available EU workers
  • All four corners of the globe. Meet some of the Institute’s passionate and dynamic members who work in almost every imaginable location across the world
  • Money in the crowd. Crowdfunding is not only an increasingly common way of raising finance; it’s one of the best ways to build brand loyalty
  • Class of 2017 competition winners. Meet our three winning graduates who joined the Institute this year through our Class of 2017 scheme
  • Get ready for new data protection law. Although it comes into law in the UK on 25 May 2018, businesses need to get GDPR ready now
  • How to employ home-based staff. Yukari Iguchi FIH offers guidance on this potential solution to the skills shortage
  • Memory Lane. John Wileman FIH looks back at some choice moments from a lifetime spent in hotel management
  • Ovens, combis and microwaves. A round-up of the latest trends in oven design and technology and what’s on the market
  • Data integration and revenue management. Pooling all of your data is essential to effective revenue management
  • A postcard from Saudi Arabia. Hospitality and tourism are central to Saudi Arabia’s ambitions

Institute of Hospitality welcomes payment specialist Lolly

PrintThe Institute of Hospitality announces a new business partnership with Lolly, a Point of Sale (PoS) and payments specialist serving small hospitality businesses across the UK: from coffee shops, pubs and night clubs, to mobile catering, pop ups and corporate caterers.

Peter Ducker FIH, chief executive, Institute of Hospitality, says: “Efficient payment systems mean a faster service, with more customers served in less time. The Institute of Hospitality prides itself on offering great partnership deals to our community of members and we are delighted to welcome Lolly, a hospitality-specific company that provides essential support to our diverse, dynamic and entrepreneurial industry.”

Peter Moore, CEO of Lolly, comments: “Through our membership of the Institute of Hospitality, we hope to align ourselves with industry colleagues, and to benefit from the knowledge-sharing and best practice, which – in turn – we will pass on to our own clients. Best practice is vital to the success and growth of the sector.”

The company offers a complete point of sale package where customers can use its EPoS software on tills and PoS tablets. Lolly then networks these to card payment machines, to speed up service and provides a cloud-based back office, supplying real-time business analytics.

Lolly provides enterprise level EPoS at an affordable price. Today, it is the only UK business of its kind that can truly scale from a downloadable product to a fully connected real-time network of tills, powered by an enterprise-level inventory reporting management system.

For more information visit the Lolly website: https://www.itslolly.com/

Resources for hospitality industry tax preparation

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USALI in the UK: resources for hospitality managers

Albert Einstein said, “The hardest thing in the world to understand is income tax.” So it is no wonder that tax time usually brings a spate of enquiries to the Institute about the Uniform System of Accounts for the Lodging Industry (11th revised edition) and its application in the hospitality industry.

Whilst the Institute isn’t qualified to provide tax advice, we can direct members to resources that can provide reputable guidance. The following are some examples of the enquiries we receive about the USALI and resources that can provide clarification

What is the basis for the USALI and why is an American system used in the UK?

arena4finance‘s Debra Adams MIH gives a good overview of the development of the USALI and discusses the changes between editions 10 and 11 in this brief article.

What are the differences between the 10th and 11th editions?

To understand the changes that were made to the 11th edition we refer members to an article from HFTP’s Tanya Venegas in the USA, summarising the changes to the latest edition of the USALI made effective January 1, 2015.

We’re a UK hospitality business; where can we find an explanation that outlines how the 11th edition’s changes affect us?

Howard Field FIH discusses the modifications the 10th edition in a HOSPA document (June 2014) and explains what those changes mean to UK accountants and hospitality businesses HERE.

Where can I get a copy of the USALI?

The USALI is available to purchase in an ebook format from the American Hotel & Lodging Association (AHLA) in the USA. The 11th edition has taken into account the globalised nature of the system’s use. Alternatively, try Amazon.co.uk.

We hope you find these resources helpful in understanding the USALI’s most recent incarnation, the 11th edition, which aims to strengthen the quality of internal reporting and improve consistency in an industry that increasingly operates across borders.