Institute of Hospitality acquires Academy of Food & Wine Service and Hospitality & Leisure Manpower

The Institute of Hospitality has made two important acquisitions: The Academy of Food & Wine Service and Hospitality & Leisure Manpower.

 The Institute’s chief executive Peter Ducker FIH explains how these businesses will fit into the Institute’s strategic plans regarding customer service and productivity.

“For 30 years the Academy of Food & Wine Service has provided training programmes, offering a pathway to management for those working in front-of-house service. It has run some important industry competitions and provided support to its members as the professional body for front-of-house food & beverage service.”

“Given our increased focus on training and the development of our own online training using the Upskill People platform, this acquisition gives us a tremendous wealth of training material which will be of tremendous value to the industry, both in the UK and overseas.”

Hospitality and Leisure Manpower (HALM) is a national training, research and consulting group, founded and managed by David Battersby OBE FIH, a former president of the Institute of Hospitality and co-founder of the Gold Service Scholarship. HALM has developed algorithms to benchmark productivity in hospitality.

In 2001, with the British Hospitality Association, Battersby launched the ‘Profit Through Productivity’ programme with backing from the Government and key trade associations. ‘Profit Through Productivity’ provided regional workshops across the UK to help businesses increase their profits and efficiency.

Ducker adds: “Given the pressures of wage inflation and the concerns associated with recruiting and retaining talent, this acquisition will enable us to help members identify opportunities within their businesses, and will also give us a service of value to the industry at large, worldwide.”

Institute chairman Stephen Kyjak-Lane FIH MI comments:

“In 2018 the Institute celebrates its 80th anniversary. These strategic acquisitions, combined with advances the Institute is making on a number of fronts demonstrate clearly that we are as important and relevant to the industry today as ever. Over the coming months you will see these two organisations re-emerge, delivering valuable support to our great industry.”

 The two organisations were previously owned by the British Institute of Innkeeping.

Southern Branch celebrates student achievements

Three students received the accolade of “Student of the Year” at The Institute of Hospitality Southern Branch’s Student Awards Gala Evening at the exclusive Lainston House Hotel, near Winchester on 2nd May.

Over ninety people attended the event, which was hosted by the celebrity chef, Steven Edwards, and featured the top college students from Dorset, Hampshire and Wiltshire who competed for prizes in the Chef, Pastry Chef and Front of House categories.

  • The Chefs’ Forum Award for Chef Student of the Year went to Reegan Graff from Kingston Maurward College.
  • The Yate Supplies Pastry Chef Student of the Year was won by Jessica Edwards from Bournemouth & Poole College.
  • The AA Front of House Student of the Year was Carmen Darmanin from Eastleigh College.

The evening  included a sumptuous three course meal prepared by the chefs at Lainston House using meat provided by the Agricultural and Horticultural Development Board (AHDB), organic fruit and vegetables from Sunnyfields and wine from Nyetimber and Bancroft.   Further sponsorship was received from the Institute of Hospitality and  Halton Foodservice.

“The competition was very close; the judges had a very difficult time choosing the winners.  It was a spectacular evening – there was a real buzz going around the room the whole night; and when the winners were announced it was electrifying!”, explained Tom Goss MIH from the IoH Southern Branch.  “We are thrilled with the high level of support that we have received from the industry and the colleges”.

In addition to Kingston Maurward College, Dorchester, Bournemouth & Poole College and Eastleigh College, entrants came from Brockenhurst College, Highbury College, South Downs College and Basingstoke College of Technology.

Press Release LOGOS jpegThe full list of finalists is as follows:

FRONT OF HOUSE
Carmen Darmanin
VTCT Diploma in Food and Beverage Service Supervision (Level 3)
Eastleigh College
Kiera Diment
Advanced Apprenticeship in Customer Service  (Level 3)
Kingston Maurward College
Jamie Duncan
VTCT Diploma in Food Service & Supervision  (Level 3)
Basingstoke College of Technology
Jack Gadd
C&G Diploma in Hospitality Supervision (Level 3)
Brockenhurst College

CHEF
Jane Doma
VTCT Diploma in Advanced Professional Cookery (Level 3)
Eastleigh College
Daniel Field
NVQ Diploma in Professional Cookery (Level 3)
South Downs College
Hannah Fisher
VRQ Advanced Diploma Professional Chef (Level 3)
Bournemouth and Poole College
Reegan Graff
Intermediate Apprenticeship in Hospitality & Catering (Level 2)
Kingston Maurward College
Precious Smith
NVQ Professional Cookery (Level 3)
Highbury College

PASTRY CHEF
Molly Scarlet Ash
C&G Advanced Diploma in Patisserie and Confectionary (Level 3)
Highbury College
Jessica Edwards
VRQ Advanced Professional Patisserie and Confectionery (Level 3)
Bournemouth and Poole College
Shannon Foreman
VTCT Diploma in Professional Patisserie and Confectionary (Level 3)
Eastleigh College

New research into wine ordering

eurochrie-research-winnerThe winners of the Institute of Hospitality Education Research Award 2016 at last year’s EuroCHRIE conference in Budapest were Henri Kuokkanen MIH  (pictured right) and Carlos da Silva MIH for their research into the future of wine ordering in restaurants

Wine can be a source of great pleasure. Yet consumers may perceive selecting wine a risk, and particularly in restaurants the choice can create stress. The solid reputation of a restaurant eases such concerns when patrons can seek advice from expert staff. When combined perfectly with food, wine elevates a meal experience to a new level. Thus wine selection is an essential component of customer experience, and the assistance a restaurant offers is critical.

A wine steward, or sommelier, acts as a facilitator in wine purchases by providing sensory descriptions of wines. While a sommelier directly boosts wine sales, he or she also indirectly augments wine revenue through better staff training. Customers generally perceive extended interaction with staff positively, generating further benefits from hiring a sommelier.

Employing trained sommeliers inevitably increases costs. In an attempt to enhance customer experience without this cost, some restaurants have replaced traditional paper wine lists with electronic tablets.

Tablets as food menus show promise in enhancing the service experience of a customer by providing extended information, but the potential of combining food and wine orders on tablets has yet to be tested. Tablets are beneficial when customers perceive value in them, and wine suggestions may be included in these tools. Restaurant revenue management may also benefit from the use of technology. However, the special role of wine in creating a dining experience calls for extra attention to how wine itself is presented; it should not merely be treated as a sub-component of the food menu.

To read more (the article The Wine Tablet Experience in the current issue of HQ Magazine, the Institute of Hospitality official publication), click here
For the full research paper, please contact Henri Kuokkanen MIH, research and education, Switzerland, email: henri.kuokkanen@gmail.com

Drop a dime on food crime with the FSA’s Food Crime Confidential

Do you suspect a business of dishonesty involving food, drink or animal feed? The NEW Food Crime Confidential is a reporting facility where anyone with suspicions about food crime can report them safely and in confidence, over the phone or through email.

Food Crime Confidential is overseen by the Food Standards Agency’s National Food Crime Unit (NFCU), which works with partners to protect consumers from serious criminal activity that impacts on the safety or authenticity of the food and drink they consume.

The facility is particularly targeted at those working in or around the UK food industry. Employees of the hospitality industry are well-placed to provide information which could help the NFCU identify and pursue offenders.

The National Food Crime Unit would like to hear from anyone who has suspicions:

  • that food or drink contains things which it shouldn’t
  • that methods used in your workplace for producing, processing, storing, labelling or transporting food do not seem quite right
  • that an item of food or drink says it is of a certain quality or from a specific place or region, but it doesn’t appear to be.FoodCrimeConfidential

‘Drop a dime’ on suspicious activities: call 0207 276 8787 or email foodcrime@foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk

Students & foodservice managers: “7 Steps to Food Cost Control”

It’s great when industry executives share wisdom gathered from years of experience in the industry and influential teachers and mentors. Kirby Payne’s succinct article, recently published by the experts at HVS Consulting, shows how a former professor still inspires Payne.

Use these 7 steps to see if your business is managing its food costs effectively
Use these 7 steps to see if your business is managing its food costs effectively

In his article, Payne highlights “7 Steps to Food Cost Control”. The list is derived from the teachings of Payne’s former professor at Florida State University, the respected hospitality academic and author Peter Dukas.

The hospitality industry adapts to the business world, but in many areas, i.e. customer service or fine dining, the tried and tested methods never lose their importance for the industry. Similarly, the 7 steps are still applicable today even though they were developed and taught over 40 years ago.

Find Payne’s practical article outlining the 7 steps HERE. Reading between the lines, however, we’d say this article is more than a practical list of how to control costs; it is a subtle tribute to the impact of Professor Dukas’s teaching.

How secure is the UK’s £200b food & drink industry?

FoodCrimeFollowing the horsemeat scandal in 2013, food crime hasn’t been making front page headlines. However, that doesn’t mean the problem has gone away. Food and drink crime often occurs ‘under the radar’ and can be difficult to detect. In addition, the sheer volume of the UK’s food and drink outlets in an industry worth £200 billion means the sector is particularly vulnerable to illegal activities from lone fraudsters to organised criminals.

The impact of food and drink fraud shouldn’t be underestimated.  The harm caused to the consumer by fake or adulterated products can result in serious illness, injury or even death. For example, the dangers of fake vodka come to mind. In business terms, this type of fraud undermines legitimate companies, the government and the sector as a whole.

Here in the UK, the Food Standards Agency’s recently formed National Food Crime Unit (NFCU) focuses on the security of food and beverages by working with UK police, Europol and Europe’s Food Fraud Network. The NFCU’s aim is to protect consumers from unsafe, adulterated or bogus food and drink by helping to prevent, detect and prosecute criminal activities involving food and drink fraud.

An excellent new NFCU report examines the issue of threats to our food and drink. Food Crime Annual Strategic Assessment: a 2016 baseline makes informative reading for anyone working in or researching the foodservice industry from kitchen staff and students to contract caterers and business owners. The report explains the impact of food and drink crime and assesses the threats posed to particular commodoties – from meat and fish to olive oil and supplements. It also highlights criminals’ techniques to help flag up suspicious activities and affected products for both consumers and the industry.

If you suspect food or drink fraud or have concerns about the provenance of a product, contact your local authority or the NFCU so they can undertake an investigation. Use the FSA’s online search facility to find the local authority’s food law enforcement officer, or send details to the National Food Crime Unit at: foodfraud@foodstandards.gsi.gov.uk.

Service on a Plate: a must-have title for academics, students and food service managers

A very readable title that examines contract catering's beginnings and looks to its future
A very readable new title that examines contract catering’s beginnings and looks to its future

Service on a Plate – The Story of Contract Catering is a new hospitality title that is essential reading for anyone studying, or working in, hospitality and food service. It reveals the unexpected twists and turns in a sector that has created more millionaires than any other part of the UK’s hospitality industry!

Co-authors Miles Quest FIH and Jim Cartwright, chairman of Dine Contract Catering, examine the sector’s lively beginnings in the chop houses and Livery Halls of Victorian London, its increasing relevance through two world wars, and the ensuing boardroom coups and takeovers in what has become a multi-billion pound industry. Today, contract catering employs over 110,000 people in the UK and is firmly embedded in many sectors including leisure, the military, healthcare and education.

“We have written a book about the industry for the industry and I hope it will both interest and entertain those who are working in it as well as encourage young people to grow their careers in contract catering,” says Jim Cartwright.

“There has been a great deal of noise recently about the increasing career opportunities in the hospitality industry and about a lack of skilled people to fill them.  At a time when many are struggling to find jobs after leaving education, the contract catering sector offers a dynamic career that has led many to a personal fortune.”

This book brings to life a sector which has provided many thousands of people with a highly successful career path and extraordinary opportunities for professional and personal growth.

Recognising the importance of Service on a Plate to budding hospitality professionals, Nestlé Professional® has provided copies of the book to catering colleges across the UK, but the Institute recommends the title to managers with an interest in the sector, for use in hospitality and business management libraries, and in academic programmes because it provides a well-written and enjoyable look at contract catering’s history and, perhaps more importantly, highlights how canny hospitality professionals recognised opportunities, strategised, and built an integral sector that now spans the globe. The book is sponsored by Dine Contract Catering Ltd and is published by H2O Publishing.

To get your copy of Service on a Plate – The Story of Contract Catering, go to Amazon www.amazon.co.uk