Institute of Hospitality’s new autumn webinars

webinar logoInstitute of Hospitality webinars are a series of informative and educational online presentations, available to members and non-members, and designed to help you advance in your professional careers and businesses.

Industry professionals and experts share their knowledge and know-how during live online sessions, that you can access from the comfort of your home, office, or from any mobile device.

Our webinars include Q&A sessions and follow-up materials. If you are unable to attend, you can log into your membership area to retrieve any past webinar recordings anytime*.

We have delivered over 50 webinars, helping hundreds of individuals improve their personal and professional skills, as well as their business knowledge.

Webinars are complimentary for members of the Institute of Hospitality. Non-members can access our live sessions for £10 (incl. VAT).

Book your webinars now

12 September 2017 3pm UK Time
First Impressions – WOW!
Sarah Brickwood MIH and Jo Woods of Smart Revenue look at the impact of the service provided to those making email or telephone enquries on eventual bookings.

26 September 2017 3pm UK Time
Food Waste Recycling
ReFood, experts in food waste recycling, look at the facts, figures and the ways to save money and food, as they celebrate the opening of their £32m anaerobic digestion facility in Dagenham.

10 October 2017 3pm UK Time
Brexit’s impact on hospitality
John Coldicutt, chief marketing officer, Planday, and the Institute’s chief executive Peter Ducker FIH present the unique findings from our survey of your experiences of Brexit.

31 October 2017 3pm UK Time
How to become a black-belt negotiator
Tom Flatau of Teamworking International advises on how to get that all-important emotional buy-in, shift the balance of power in your favour, and stop getting beaten down on price and making unnecessary concessions.

14 November 2017 3pm UK Time
How to blend e-Learning with other formats
Pete Fullard of Upskill People provides a case study of the University Caterers Organisation’s strategy to work with the specific needs of its membership to implement e-learning as part of a blend of wider methods of delivering, tracking and analysing knowledge and skills.

28 November 2017 3pm UK Time
Loyalty and love
Reka Mizsei, lectuerer, Glion Institute
Are hotel guests loyal because of the incentive they get from loyalty programmes or are they loyal because they love the brand? Do hotels need a loyalty programme to gain brand love?

12 December 2017 3pm UK Time
Immigration and discrimination – planning for 2018 and beyond
Jonathan Gray, partner employment and licensing law, Pitmans LLP
To review the latest thinking on Brexit and immigration issues as at the end of 2017, and to consider how to fill the potential staff/skill gaps of the future by being a successful equal opportunities employer. This will include how to properly manage the gender pay gap reporting obligations and what to be aware of from an age discrimination perspective when seeking to attract and retain younger and older workers.

Book your webinars now

Note: If the scheduled time (3pm UK time on Tuesdays) is not convenient, you can still access the webinars at a later date from our website.

 

Advertisements

Summer edition of HQ Magazine

web resThe summer issue of HQ Magazine will be arriving in the post shortly.  Our main cover story takes a spin around the globe in a celebration of our international community of members.

From the mountains of Iraq to the beaches of Bangladesh, from the bright lights of Vegas to the dark waters of the North Sea, the Institute of Hospitality has passionate and dynamic members working in every imaginable location across the world.

In other features, participants in our recent roundtable discussion on Brexit and recruitment found creative ways to combat the reduction in available EU workers. Read the article here.

We also have informative and practical articles about raising money via crowdfunding platforms and how to employ home-based workers. Who knew that more than half of travel agents in the US work from home?

HQ Magazine comes out four times a year and is posted to members of the Institute of Hospitality and also available to read online. To receive your magazine become a member of the Institute of Hospitality or subscribe by emailing: subscriptions@instituteofhospitality.org

Here is a summary of this issue’s contents. A big thank you to all of our contributors.

  • Stewart McKenzie FIH on the real satisfactions to be found in a healthcare catering career
  • Adam Rowledge FIH SJS says more collaboration between industry, students and educators will benefit our industry at large
  • Alexander Wilson MIH reflects on the long-lasting benefits of mentoring relationships
  • Institute of Hospitality Awards 2017. Four Seasons Hotel London at Park Lane won Talent Development Team of the Year. Meet all our winners
  • Hospitality Assured Awards 2017. Best UK newcomer is EMCOR UK on Three. Find out who else won these prestigious awards
  • Brexit and recruitment. Our roundtable participants find creative ways to combat the reduction in available EU workers
  • All four corners of the globe. Meet some of the Institute’s passionate and dynamic members who work in almost every imaginable location across the world
  • Money in the crowd. Crowdfunding is not only an increasingly common way of raising finance; it’s one of the best ways to build brand loyalty
  • Class of 2017 competition winners. Meet our three winning graduates who joined the Institute this year through our Class of 2017 scheme
  • Get ready for new data protection law. Although it comes into law in the UK on 25 May 2018, businesses need to get GDPR ready now
  • How to employ home-based staff. Yukari Iguchi FIH offers guidance on this potential solution to the skills shortage
  • Memory Lane. John Wileman FIH looks back at some choice moments from a lifetime spent in hotel management
  • Ovens, combis and microwaves. A round-up of the latest trends in oven design and technology and what’s on the market
  • Data integration and revenue management. Pooling all of your data is essential to effective revenue management
  • A postcard from Saudi Arabia. Hospitality and tourism are central to Saudi Arabia’s ambitions

“We want people from everywhere”

brexitAn important ingredient of the UK hospitality industry’s success has been relatively little interference from government, writes Derek Taylor OBE FIH. Brexit could change that.

Italo Zangiacomi was the manager of the Piccadilly Hotel in London. Hector Zavatoni was the banqueting manager at the Savoy. Cesare Maggi was the restaurant manager at the Ritz. They were among the 470 Italians who died when the Arandora Star, taking them to internment in Canada in July 1940, was torpedoed in the Atlantic.

The cream of the British hotel industry perished in that disaster 77 years ago; eight hundred and sixty five in all lost their lives and only thirteen bodies have ever been recovered. There is an annual mass at St. Peter’s Italian Church in Clerkenwell every July to remember the calamity and in 2010 a memorial cloister garden was opened at St. Andrews Roman Catholic Church in Glasgow. There are other memorials too.

Italy was an Axis power, but even so, the reputation of their hotel and restaurant staff was so good that top banqueting managers in the 1960s were still expected to be Italian. When the Welshman, Bryan Evans, was appointed banqueting manager at the Savoy, the chair of the company and future Lord Mayor of London, Sir Hugh Wontner, insisted that he be known as Evangelo Brioni.

We owe a great deal to a large number of foreigners who embellished our industry. We certainly don’t want the government to now inflict some petty chauvinist restriction on our great multi-cultural hotel and restaurant world. We want to take anybody from anywhere who can do the job well.

You’ve seen ice work, butter work and sugar work. Who invented it? George IV’s chef, Marie-Antoine Carême, can take a lot of the credit.  Carême came over from France after Waterloo and set standards never seen before.  We have great traditions as an international industry. It is right to remember another Frenchman, Alexis Soyer, from the Reform Club, who died in the Crimea feeding the troops in the War against Russia. Or where would we have got à la carte from, if Auguste Escoffier hadn’t come up with the idea with Cesar Ritz at the Carlton. The language in top kitchens in 1945 was still French. Bedroom lighting owes a great deal to Ritz. In fairness, excellent British hotel marketing was home-grown.

Ever since the Second World War, the hotel and restaurant industry in this country has steadily progressed. At exactly the same time traditional industries – ship building, coal mining, steel manufacturing – have gone down the drain. So to what can we attribute our success? Well, almost total neglect by successive governments has been an enormous help. Admittedly, they picked us out for special taxation in the 1960s because we weren’t making anything. Agreed, they nearly bankrupted us with the Grant Scheme in the early 1970s, but overall they have let us get on with it and we have flourished. Now they are threatening to interfere again.

There is a question mark over whether we should welcome overseas immigrants after Brexit.

Well, let me tell you one thing. If you were going to deport everybody with a foreign ancestor from this country, there’d be hardly anybody left. The Britons were shoved out of the East side of the country by the Anglo-Saxons in the 8th century. You’ll still find some in Cornwall, but not in Devon.

We are all foreigners – Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, Flemings, Huguenots, Poles and many others. Only the Vikings went home. Immigrants are usually the pick of the crop. Even the prime minister’s family benefited from being allowed to emigrate. In the 16th century, her ancestor, John Spooner, emigrated to Holland and died there.

Bring it up to date. Only 50 years ago we weren’t in the Common Market and the British hotel world was desperate for staff. Brian Worthington, one of our best human resources directors, went down on his knees at the Home Office and begged them to let him bring in the staff we needed from – the Phillipines. Having assured themselves that our natives wouldn’t work in the industry, the Home Office acquiesced.

It’s no use  people saying that if the people from overseas are shut out the British will do the jobs. The only way in which the industry has kept up its standards of service is by recruiting from everywhere. Because of international influences, we are better cooks – we get Michelin stars now – and better managers. Admittedly, we are brilliant entrepreneurs, housekeepers, hall porters and barmen. We have one problem; how many parents hope that when their children grow up, they will be restaurant managers and chefs? They do in Switzerland, Italy and France.

I once asked Lord Forte, a great hotelier, why the British didn’t cook as well as the continentals. He explained: “It’s not part of the culture. In Britain we – we garden.”  And so we do – better than anybody else in the world. We also cook pretty well now – but foreigners laid down the ground rules and there is more we can do to improve many aspects of our business.

Dear Mrs. May, you have a whole string of problems at the moment. Why don’t you continue to let us get on with it. Our damp island is fifth in the world tourist rankings. We do a lot better than the football team. Please continue the traditional government policy of leaving us alone.

Derek Taylor OBE FIH is an internationally-renowned expert on hotel marketing. His eighth book Revolutionary Hotel Marketing is published by the Institute of Hospitality and available from Amazon

Institute Announces New Webinar Season

The Institute of Hospitality launches its new season of webinars with an American perspective on ‘Brexit’s silver lining’. 

For American visitors to the UK, prices are now 30% lower than two years ago thanks to the sharp drop in sterling triggered by the EU referendum result.  In the coming months, there are strong signs that the UK is set to enjoy record-beating levels of inbound tourism. How can operators capitalise on this boom?

Peter Ducker, chief executive, Institute of Hospitality, says: “American tourists have always been our biggest spenders. Now that they will be arriving in greater numbers, there is no better time to fine-tune our customer service skills in order to wow guests and keep them coming back.  We are delighted to kick-start our webinar season with Simon Hudson, a distinguished hospitality expert from the University of South Carolina, who will deliver his unique insights into what American tourists are looking for.”

Institute of Hospitality webinars give busy hospitality professionals a full briefing on a current operational topic in 30-40 minutes. You can also ask questions and receive follow-up materials. Full programme below.

Institute of Hospitality Webinars Autumn 2016

6 September
Capitalising on Brexit’s Silver Lining
The whys and hows of training employees to wow American tourists in order to secure long-term lucrative loyalty
Dr Simon Hudson, College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management, University of South Carolina

20 September
We have data but how can we use it?
On average a hotel receives data from more than 12 systems everyday. Get some great tips on how to use this data while still remaining a hotelier and focusing on taking care of guests
Janel Clark, head of consultancy and education, Snapshot

4 October
Make the OTAs work for you
Learn how to embrace the role of OTAS, reduce the commission you pay, adopt an OTA strategy where you are in control and invest wisely in your hotel website
Andrew Plant, digital marketing manager, Journey

18 October
Food Allergens and Customer Excellence
The Food Allergen HACCP and due diligence framework not only helps protect your business but also appeals to a critically wary customer base, who above all want transparency and deserve service excellence like any other customer.
Julian Edwards MIH, director, Allergen Accreditation

1 November
Addressing the risk of human trafficking
The nature and necessities of human trafficking place hotel businesses in a high level of exposure. Identify the vulnerabilities in your business and discover what you can do to prevent, mitigate or eliminate the risk of human trafficking in your business.
Professor Angela Roper FIH, University of West London, and Dr Maureen Brookes, Oxford Brookes University

15 November
The effect of Brexit on employment and immigration rights
What’s the position now and what might change? What are the lessons from the Byron Hamburgers furore this summer? Find out how businesses can get ahead of potential changes.
Jonathan Gray, hospitality, tourism and leisure partner, Pitmans LLP

Institute of Hospitality Chief Executive Peter Ducker shares his opinion on the impact of #Brexit

The nation has spoken, and we have to live with the outcome.

The UK opts to leave the EU
‘ Keep Calm and Carry On’ has never been more apt as the UK opts out of the EU

The great and good have already called for stability and of course we at the Institute of Hospitality echo that sentiment. The hospitality industry has demonstrated its’ resilience time and again, and will, I am sure, do so now. 

In the short term, hospitality in the UK may prosper as the weaker pound makes us a more affordable destination, and more Brits may choose to stay at home – rain or shine.  

Longer term, a major concern has to be for our UK workforce given that we have a history of recruiting hospitality staff from Europe.

Most importantly, it is essential that the UK Government and those involved in negotiating our future place in the world bear hospitality in mind. In terms of numbers employed, tax take and contribution to GDP ours is a major industry – the 4th largest by employment terms in the UK.  In many parts of the UK hospitality is the lifeblood of the regional economy. It is vital that the impact of new trade arrangements are considered by those at the negotiating table.

Our members who work internationally will be watching the UK situation unfold with interest, and we will be monitoring the reaction both from those within the EU and those outside and reporting back to members. In the meantime, we remain optimistic and prepared to undertake the task at hand – educating and supporting the development of world class hospitality managers and their businesses.

Institute of Hospitality EU Referendum survey results…

A slim majority of UK hospitality managers will vote to stay in the EU, according to a survey by the Institute of Hospitality.

Just over half of respondents (52.4%) said they would vote to stay in the EU, while more than a third (36.3%) said they would vote to leave, and 11.3% remained undecided.

Brexit3
Make sure you are registered to vote on the 23 June

A little more than half (50.6%) of respondents thought that the UK hospitality industry would suffer outside the EU, while nearly one third (32.7%) thought that it would thrive.  16.7% of respondents were not sure either way.

The majority of respondents (53.8%) thought that employment was the key issue for the UK hospitality industry when voting in the EU referendum.

The next most important issue was tourism/customer demand (29.4%), while smaller numbers of respondents considered sovereignty (7.6%), the economy (5.9%) and red tape (3.3%) as the key issues for the UK hospitality sector.

Commenting on the results, Peter Ducker, chief executive of the Institute of Hospitality, said: “More than two thirds of our members are senior managers and our survey has revealed strong points of view on both sides of the debate. For those who are still undecided on how to vote on 23 June, we have reports and research relevant to hospitality, travel and tourism available to read and download from our homepage.”

The above survey results are based on 273 responses to an email survey sent to UK Institute of Hospitality members on 11 May 2016.

To determine if you are eligible to vote or registered check the GOV.UK website for further information.

How will #Brexit affect you and your hospitality business? The Institute of Hospitality weighs in

UK members of the Institute of Hospitality, like many in the UK, want to make an informed decision in the forthcoming EU referendum on 23 June. However, a lack of clear information on the referendum, often referred to as ‘Brexit’ or the ‘In Out’ referendum or campaign, has left voters baffled.

In or Out? Our articles can help you decide
In or Out? Our articles can help you decide

In a carefully considered and informative article, the Institute’s editor, Ben Walker, examines the arguments both for – and against – a British exit from the EU, and obtains input from hospitality industry experts.

Read the article, Should we stay or should we go?, today and, no matter what your opinion, tell us whether you plan on voting to stay or go (or are undecided) in our quick 5 Second Survey which will be emailed to all members. We’ll share the results of the survey soon.

Need further clarification about how different associations and ‘think tanks’ believe our industry will be affected? The Institute has compiled a free resource to provide opinion gathered from other organisations to inform members. Access the article and links, EU referendum: further reading, HERE.