The Menu Museum

menu museum logo large(1)A Brighton-based academic is bringing a unique archive of menus to the attention of the wider international hospitality industry and education practitioners with the aim that it will remain free to users and continue to grow.

The Menu Museum is an interactive online menu archive that facilitates research and teaching in menu design, pricing and food and beverage trends. It currently features more than 640 menus and has over 1,500 users.

Ioannis Pantelidis FIH, principal lecturer in hospitality and culinary arts at the University of Brighton, started the website with his colleague Ken Woodward. Pantelidis says: “I had a big collection of restaurant menus that I was using for food and beverage management-related modules, so I had numerous folders that I used to carry to my classes. When I came to Brighton I started teaching a module with Ken. He had his own collection, so when we put the two together we had about 500 menus which we scanned and uploaded onto the website. Since then a further 140 menus have been uploaded by users, which is great.”

The collection includes a menu replica from the Titanic (1912) and a 19th century menu from the Dorchester Hotel, London.  Menus can be searched for by country and year of origin. Once registered, users can upload their own menus or collections of menus.

BU_23NOV17_AW_047

Pantelidis adds that the website continues to be a work in progress and wants to bring it to the wider attention of the international hospitality community in order for it to grow.

The website can be an important teaching aid. Pantelidis has used it to compare a 1970s Dorchester menu with its equivalent today. He says: Students are able to explore the differences – how the pricing strategies differ, the design and the types of dishes on the menu. I want to keep the website free and I want the community to use it.”

The Menu Museum won the 2017 Teaching Innovation Award,  presented by
The Council of Hospitality Management Education, in association with the SHARE center.

The Menu Museum received initial funding from the European Union. Subsequently both the Savoy Educational Trust and Trigger Solutions have helped with server hosting and maintenance costs.

BU_23NOV17_AW_050adjustedFor further information about supporting the Menu Museum, please contact:
Dr Ioannis S. Pantelidis FIH – Principal Lecturer
Admissions, recruitment, marketing & WP leader
School of Sport and Service Management
University of Brighton,  Darley Road, Eastbourne, BN20 7UR
Tel:  +44 1273 64 4748   Email: isp12@brighton.ac.uk

 

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The Menu Museum

menu museum logo large(1)A Brighton-based academic is bringing a unique archive of menus to the attention of the wider international hospitality industry and education practitioners with the aim that it will remain free to users and continue to grow.

The Menu Museum is an interactive online menu archive that facilitates research and teaching in menu design, pricing and food and beverage trends. It currently features more than 640 menus and has over 1,500 users.

Ioannis Pantelidis FIH, principal lecturer in hospitality and culinary arts at the University of Brighton, started the website with his colleague Ken Woodward. Pantelidis says: “I had a big collection of restaurant menus that I was using for food and beverage management-related modules, so I had numerous folders that I used to carry to my classes. When I came to Brighton I started teaching a module with Ken. He had his own collection, so when we put the two together we had about 500 menus which we scanned and uploaded onto the website. Since then a further 140 menus have been uploaded by users, which is great.”

The collection includes a menu replica from the Titanic (1912) and a 19th century menu from the Dorchester Hotel, London.  Menus can be searched for by country and year of origin. Once registered, users can upload their own menus or collections of menus.

Pantelidis adds that the website continues to be a work in progress and wants to bring it to the wider attention of the international hospitality community in order for it to grow.

The website can be an important teaching aid. Pantelidis has used it to compare a 1970s Dorchester menu with its equivalent today. He says: Students are able to explore the differences – how the pricing strategies differ, the design and the types of dishes on the menu. I want to keep the website free and I want the community to use it.”

The Menu Museum won the 2017 Teaching Innovation Award,  presented by
The Council of Hospitality Management Education, in association with the SHARE center.

The Menu Museum received initial funding from the European Union. Subsequently both the Savoy Educational Trust and Trigger Solutions have helped with server hosting and maintenance costs.

For further information about supporting the Menu Museum, please contact:
Dr Ioannis S. Pantelidis FIH – Principal Lecturer
Admissions, recruitment, marketing & WP leader
School of Sport and Service Management
University of Brighton,  Darley Road, Eastbourne, BN20 7UR
Tel:  +44 1273 64 4748   Email: isp12@brighton.ac.uk

Institute to share high-quality research with industry

9 Maria Gebbels MIH
Lecturers, including Maria Gebbels MIH at the University of Greenwich, are encouraging their students to submit research to the Insitute of Hospitality Digest


Calling all hospitality management students. Have your coursework published in the Institute of Hospitality Digest and share it with industry leaders ( first edition deadline is 16 October).

The Institute of Hospitality Digest will be a new online collection of the very best research by student members studying at our international community of universities and colleges. We are now accepting submissions for the first edition.

The aim of the Institute of Hospitality Digest is to collect the very best academic research and share it with the Institute’s wider community of operators and managers.

The Institute’s chief executive Peter Ducker FIH says: “We hope that the Institute of Hospitality Digest plays a role in bringing academia and industry closer together and encourages colleges to undertake research that has a practical application for today’s and tomorrow’s managers.”

The Digest has been welcomed by lecturers. Dr Maria Gebbels MIH, Lecturer in Hospitality Management at the University of Greenwich, says: “This is a brilliant idea and I hope that our students will be excited to share their dissertation research on this e-platform.”

Cora Huen, Head of Program, Division of Tourism and Hospitality, Hong Kong College of Technology, says: “This idea is indeed an effective platform for institutions to showcase the employability credentials of their students.”

Professor Brian King, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, says: “Our students will be greatly encouraged to know that such an outlet is available to disseminate their work.”

The Institute has 75 universities and colleges on its Education Membership Scheme, adding up to more than 3,000 student members across the world.

The Institute of Hospitality Digest welcomes your submissions.
Submit your research now.
Download the submission guidelines

 

Coffee and Books DO Mix: New Report on Foodservice and Libraries

These days, coffee and books DO mix as libraries and foodservice collaborate
These days, coffee and books DO mix, as libraries and foodservice collaborate

Food and books: two of my favourite things. In the not-so-distant past, food and drink consumption in libraries was taboo. Librarians were seen as fierce and uncompromising when they forced library patrons outside with their illicit cups of coffee and secreted snacks. However, there is a reason for the librarians’ vociferous objections. Replacement costs for spillages in books places a strain on already depleted library budgets and, more importantly, traces of food in or around books attracts vermin and insects, which like to feast on book binding glue. Insect infestations can spell disaster for a library’s business continuity plan.

These days librarians have conceded that users need their caffeine – albeit in spill-proof containers – and (tidy) snacks to keep their energy up when browsing the stacks or conducting marathon study sessions. Library footfall is essential to retain funding and, for entrepreneurial libraries, a cup of coffee and a bite to eat could be the answer.

Public and academic libraries have seen the success of bookstore cafes and taken a page out of their book! Think Waterstones’ cafes – but with free books – and the synergies between libraries and foodservice businesses become apparent.

A new US report explains how foodservice providers can determine whether expansion into libraries is viable. The report, The Survey of Library Cafes & Food Service (2014), examines cafes and other food service operations in public and academic libraries. It provides “valuable and unique data on best-selling products, revenues and sources of revenues, expansion plans, catering revenues, salary costs, seating and decor and other facets of library cafe and food service operation”.

The British Library's astonishingly beautiful cafe and library.
The British Library’s stunning cafe and library

The data covers academic and public libraries in the United States and is broken out by library size which is defined by annual library budget and visitor numbers. Planners will find answers to questions such as: “what are personnel costs for the typical cafe? How much revenue is accounted for by lunch traffic? Do cafes cater outside events and if so, how much do they earn?” Although the data is from the US, it reflects the typical use of library foodservice offerings by patrons, whether they are students or the general public.

In addition, foodservice providers can, by working with any library’s managers, obtain valuable data from the library regarding patron profiles, the type of food and drinks that might appeal, the times of day when service will be at a premium and more.

To locate further articles exploring the foodservice offering within public and academic libraries, try Libraries with Coffee Shops for insights into the benefits of mixing coffee and books.