Institute of Hospitality Awards 2018 Winners

280 hospitality professionals came together this week (19 June) to celebrate the very best in people development at the Institute of Hospitality Annual Dinner & Awards.

(For coverage of the Hospitality Assured Awards, click here)

web BaxterStorey -talent development team of the yearTalent Development Team of the Year – BaxterStorey
Sponsored by Tchibo

BaxterStorey’s nine-month graduate programme fast tracks candidates into managerial roles. Now in its seventh year, it receives over 500 applications from hospitality graduates per year, proving how popular and recognised the programme is.

In 2017, BaxterStorey launched its newest training initiative: the Service Academy. Designed to ensure hospitality staff across the business are equipped with skills and confidence to provide a service to rival that of a five-star hotel, the initiative is the first of its kind within the hospitality industry. It was developed by graduate Gabrielle Le Roux AIH who successfully completed the WSET Wine Educator programme and led the application for BaxterStorey to become the first UK Contract Caterer accredited to deliver WSET courses. This also makes her the first APP educator within the foodservice industry, and she is responsible for running the training available to all 8,500 BaxterStorey staff.

web PPHE Group winnerBest Student Placement of the Year –  PPHE Hotel Group
Sponsored by Pitmans Law

PPHE Hotel Group’s you:niversityplus undergraduate placement programme has been crafted into a learning curriculum specifically designed to support the students’ development and journey in accordance with the Springboard INSPIRE kite mark. PPHE has engaged with several UK and Netherlands based universities, including Surrey, Bournemouth, Brighton, Leeds, Manchester, Portsmouth, Plymouth, Birmingham, Chester, Sunderland, and Stenden Hotel School.

Sixteen successful students (out of 140 applications) went through the selection process.
Regional training manager Paresh Vara said: “Inducting our students in the right way was important to us. We wanted them to feel welcome and know that they had made the right choice by joining our company. We designed a ‘Fresher’s Week’ full of great induction activities, starting on their first day with our company induction workshop: Connect!

“A Whatsapp group was created prior to the arrival of the students. We also provided them with an induction workbook, the Discovery Book to track their learning and serve as a reference tool throughout the placement. Their Fresher’s Week also consisted of a hotel welcome, a “get to know London”, using Twitter and Instagram to snap #landmarkselfies. Their week ended with a treasure hunt across the London hotels.”

web Hilton - best grad schemeBest Graduate Scheme of the Year – Hilton UK & Ireland
Sponsored by Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne

 Hilton UK & Ireland’s Management Development Programme was introduced in 2012 with the objective of developing the future talent pool for operational roles (assistant/departmental manager). The overall aim is to cultivate and prepare individuals who have the potential and drive to reach at least departmental manager status within 18 months. Their experience includes two nine-month hotel placements in the UK covering two main areas in each placement (F&B and front office), five residential workshops and two business-driven projects.

The graduates are assigned a hotel senior leader as mentor and also have a ‘graduate group leader’ who oversees four or five of them as a peer-group to provide additional support, guidance and direction. Since the programme’s inception in 2012, it has successfully filled 58 leadership positions.

web outstanding award Enam AliOutstanding Contribution to the Industry – Enam Ali MBE FIH
Sponsored by JING

Enam Ali MBE FIH is among the most prominent British Asian personalities and the man behind revolutionary change in the curry industry. He began his community work by establishing numerous trade associations in the 1990s and published the industry’s first and leading trade publication, Spice Business Magazine, in 1997. Subsequently he founded the Annual British Curry Awards in 2005 which is dubbed as the ‘Curry Oscars’. He is also the founder of multi award-winning restaurant Le Raj and recently established a training restaurant Le Raj Academy @ NESCOT college. Alongside this, Ali has developed outstanding relationships in the political arena as a member of the Home Office Hospitality Advisory Panel. In 2009 Enam was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in the 2009 New Year Honours for his services to the Indian and Bangladeshi restaurant industry.

web judges special award The Grand FolkestoneJudges Special Achievement AwardRobert Richardson FIH and The Grand, Folkestone
Sponsored by Planday

Peter Ducker FIH, chief executive, Institute of Hospitality, commented: “Robert has demonstrated a tireless energy and determination to support colleagues, using creative and inspiring methods to attract and retain an engaged and enthusiastic team despite not having the funds and support of a big brand behind him.”

The following organisations were Highly Commended by the judges.

web concord highly commended

Best Graduate Scheme Highly Commended – Concord Hotels

web the ritz highly commended

Best Student Placement Highly Commended – The Ritz 

web good hotel group highly commended

Talent Development Team Highly Commended – Good Hotel London

The Institute of Hospitality Annual Dinner & Awards 2018 were generously supported by the overall sponsor workforce collaboration software company Planday. The other event sponsors were Meiko and aslotel. The venue sponsor was Park Plaza Westminster Bridge.

The judges were Angela Maher, Head of Hospitality School at Oxford Brookes Business School; Wendy Sutherland, Managing Director, Ramsay Todd; Alex Wilson MIH, House Manager at Rocco Forte Hotels.

If you would like to register your interest in entering the 2019 awards or attending the event please email your contact details to events@instituteofhospitality.org and we will keep you updated.

Thanks to all those who attended and shared the event via social media. Follow the conversation #IOHAwards on Twitter – @IoH_online

 

 

 

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The remarkable rise of Starbucks in China

56 alan hepburnOur man in Shanghai, Alan Hepburn FIH, provides an analysis of Starbucks’ expansion in China, a country with no tradition of coffee-drinking. What lessons are there for other western businesses looking to break into this vast market?

Last week I was sat in the 30,000 sq ft Starbucks Shanghai Roastery, about five minutes walk from my apartment in Shanghai. I was there for a business meeting, trying to decide between Sumatran, Ethiopian or Nicaraguan, when I realised I was next to a couple of friends. After a quick chat, it occured to me that even in a city of 35 million people with change being constant and exponential, it’s a small world.

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Howard Schultz at the opening of Starbuck’s Shanghai Roastery in December 2017

I arrived here in 2000 as manager of the Portman Ritz Carlton and remember chatting with Howard Schultz when he came to open the first Starbucks in the city (Beijing opened the first one in China in 1999). I somewhat naively asked if he was planning on opening many? He looked somewhat incredulous at my ill-judged question. “We expect 100 in the first year,” he said. They now have 3,000 stores in China and are opening one every 15 hours – projecting 5,000 by 2020.

I was new to China and frankly had not observed much coffee-drinking going on. But what I had missed was … well, pretty much everything.

What Starbucks saw in China was four things: firstly the growth potential in the middle/upper middle class who want to buy an upscale Western experience.

Shanghai_Roastery_(8)

The floor space of a Starbucks in China is substantially bigger than in the West. People have business meetings, social gatherings, go on dates and get interviewed for jobs in China’s Starbucks. The saying here is: “The first two thirds of your cup is for enjoying, the last third is for staying.” Three quarters of all coffee drunk in China is consumed by 25-35 year olds and 99% of retail coffee sales is instant, but that will change.

Secondly, Starbucks’ growth in China shows the importance of not removing the essence of what makes you successful elsewhere, but shows how this needs to be adapted. As Roy T Bennet once said: “The past is a place of reference, not a place of residence.”

The Macha Frappuccino (220 – 440 calories depending on size) is a huge seller here. Green tea powder, loads of cream, milk and vanilla syrup and not a hint of coffee in sight. I have struggled in the past to get a simple espresso, as very few people are drinking them in China. But that will change.

The Roastery here is a modern-day F&B masterpiece with all the theatre of coffee roasting, artisan bread-making and stunning retail. But take a look at what people are consuming and it’s a lot less coffee than you might expect. But, as I say, that will change.

Starbucks_Roastery_Shanghai_-_Top_10_Things_(20) web
The Chinese are not big coffee drinkers, but that has not been a barrier to Starbucks’ success

Thirdly, brands which understand progression from entry-level to premium do very well here. There are famous dumpling shops where you pay four different prices according to where you consume the same dumpling.

The last thing Starbucks understood was marketing. Their social media presence was well-established and generally ahead of most Western brands in China during its first decade here. The rest tried catch-up and some succeeded but most failed. Telling your brand story here needs content and context and it better be entertaining and fun. I spoke with the head of marketing for one of the world’s biggest and coolest sports fashion brands two years ago and he was telling me they had just moved into mobile platform selling. That’s like arriving today in Scotland and telling them you just invented whisky.

Sadly, many Western brands can’t grasp the speed of change and that the Chinese consumer is dynamic, developing and learning quickly. By the time many companies work out their ‘China strategy’ the market may have moved or changed.

I’ve lost count of the number of UK companies (including the famous ones) I speak to and meet with who bring a rigid ‘what made us successful in the past will determine all our action for the future’ attitude and end up closing shop, heading home and blaming China.

Don’t get mad, get prepared. Starbucks’ next Roastery opens in Milan, the home of great coffee and design.  But before we mention coals and Newcastle, I’m betting Starbucks have that well-covered too.

Alan Hepburn FIH has spent more than 30 years in Asia in the hospitality and lifestyle sector. Having run some of the world’s best hotels , he then developed, opened and operated China’s first luxury lifestyle company: the multi-award winning Three On The Bund in Shanghai. The Hepburn Group is a Shanghai/Singapore-based boutique consultancy that works with hospitality and F&B companies from the West, helping them navigate the challenges of market-entry and growth in China and Asia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Emirati and Italian Architects win Second Annual Bespoke Access Award to Champion Accessible Hospitality

Robin Sheppard, Baroness Celia Thomas, Maher Hadid (MnM Studio Architects)web res
Robin Sheppard, Baroness Celia Thomas, Maher Hadid (MnM Studio Architects)

At the second annual special event held at the Palace of Westminster on April 18th, MnM Studio Architects, along with Maria Brighenti and Marcello D’Orsi, were announced the joint winners of the 2017/18 Bespoke Access Awards, a design competition to create accessible solutions, run in association with the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and featuring a prize fund of £30,000.

MnM Studio devised an innovative accommodation solution based around the four senses of smell, taste, sound and sight, with extensive use of Braille throughout. Termed “empathy through aesthetics”, the system aims to support the emotional state of the guest, while maintaining a distinct visual appeal via a stylish, curved design.

“’Empathy through aesthetics’ perfectly encapsulates what we are aiming to do with the Access initiative”, commented Baroness Celia Thomas, Chair of the Judging Panel and Patron of the Awards. “The emphasis placed on the emotional state of the guest was particularly impressive, given this is an area that is often overlooked.”

Alongside MnM Studio, freelance Italian architects Maria Brightei and Marcello D’Orsi were successful in the Architectural category, as well as being announced joint winners of the overall Celia Thomas Prize, worth a total of £20,000. Their design, which focused on the means through which existing accommodation can be renovated with the disabled traveler in mind, concentrated on the public spaces of hotels, and how subtle enhancements can be made to significantly increase the ease with which they are passed through.

Robin Sheppard, Baroness Celia Thomas, Marcello D'Orsi web res
Robin Sheppard, Baroness Celia Thomas, Marcello D’Orsi

“I was particularly struck by the attention they had paid to the customer journey through reception and the lobby areas”, commented Alan Stanton, Stirling Prize-winning architect and member of the Judging Panel. “These are areas often overlooked by both architects and business owners alike, and it is easy to think of them as merely transient. But they can significantly improve or disrupt a guest’s experience, so it was exciting to see them highlighted and approached with such care.”

“The architectural community across the country has really embraced the Access Awards since their launch in 2016”, added Jane Duncan, RIBA Immediate Past President. “It is tremendously encouraging for the future of accessible tourism to see this year’s awards attracting interest from around the world, as well as ideas shining a light on some of the more often-overlooked aspects of disabled travel.”

The competition attracted submissions spanning the length and breadth of the UK, as well as from across Europe and Asia. Entrants competed across an expanded range of categories, including Product Design, Architecture, Service Applications (Digital) and Service Applications (Training). Alongside the overall Celia Thomas Prize, worth £20,000 and believed to be the largest cash prize in the UK for a design concept.

“We were extremely pleased to see the competition attracting a truly global roster of entrants this year”, said Robin Sheppard FIH, Chairman of Bespoke Hotels and recently appointed Hotel Sector Champion for Disabled People. “The Access Awards continue to grow and evolve, but the high quality of entries ensures our collective focus remains on improving the experience for all hotel guests, whether disabled or otherwise.”

The entries were judged at the turn of the year by a panel which included Paralympic gold medalist Baroness Tanni Grey-Thompson, Stirling Prize-winning architect Alan Stanton, Baroness Celia Thomas, Tom Perry, Head of the Cities Programme at the Design Council, Graeme Whippy, Disability Specialist for Channel Four, Alastair Hignell CBE, alongside Robin Sheppard.

Full list of winners:
MnM Studio Architects, Dubai
Joint Winners of the Celia Thomas Prize

Maria Brighenti with Marcello D’Orsi, Italy
Joint Winners of the Celia Thomas Prize

MnM Studio Architects, Dubai
Joint Winners of the Architecture Category

Maria Brighenti with Marcello D’Orsi, Italy
Joint Winners of the Architecture Category

Wilson Mason LLP, Lancashire
Winners of the Product Design Category

Purcell, London
Winners of the Service Applications (Training) Category

Neatebox Ltd, London
Winners of Service Applications (Digital) Category

Full list of judges:
Robin Sheppard, Chairman, Bespoke Hotels Group
Celia, Baroness Thomas of Winchester, House of Lords
Alan Stanton OBE, Stanton Williams
Tanni, Baroness Grey-Thompson, Paralympic Gold Medallist, House of Lords
Graeme K Whippy MBE, Disability Specialist for Channel 4
Alastair Hignall CBE, Trustee of the Leonard Cheshire Foundation
Tom Perry, Head of the Cities Programme at the Design Council
Sarah Weir OBE, Chief Executive of Design Council
Paul Gregory, MCIBSE, MSLL, Global Specification Director for Dyson.

www.bespokehotels.com/access
#BespokeAccess

How restaurants are reacting to Vegetarian Month

March is vegetarian month. Recent news shows that an estimated 29% of evening meals in the UK are vegetarian or vegan. These numbers only seem to be increasing, but just how is the hospitality industry reacting? Wayne Redge reports

Reports show that sales of meat-free ready meals were up by 15% in January compared to 12 months before. Vegan numbers went up from 150,000 in 2006 to 540,000 just a decade later, with 1.2 million vegetarians in addition to this in the UK. Not only that, but there has been an uprising of ‘flexitarians’, those who reduce their meat consumption by choosing to have meat-free days. As a result, evidence shows that 25% of people in Britain have cut back on how much meat they eat. With all of these figures on the rise, the transitions to a meat-free way of living aren’t just a ‘fad’.

Signs of the hospitality industry acknowledging these statistics has come with many different reactions. Nando’s, the Afro-Portuguese chain restaurant known for its chicken, has been consistently adding to its range of vegetarian and vegan options over the past few years. The spiced chicken giant has now announced that two more vegetarian dishes will be added to its menu: golden brown halloumi sticks served with a pot of sweet chilli jam dip to start, alongside a new main of Veggie Cataplana (a South African inspired stew dish.)

A host of vegetarian restaurants are also popping up, giving people who have adopted this lifestyle a lot more options. Run by former mentee of Gordon Ramsay, Minal Patel, “Prashad” is a 2 rosette and Bib Gourmand standard Indian cuisine restaurant. The personalised and crafted menu boards created by Smart Hospitality encase an all vegetarian menu that has been the talk of popular review site, Trip Advisor, since the restaurant opened its doors. Receiving the “Most Talked About Restaurant On Trip Advisor Award” and a “Certificate of Excellence” on the site, it is proof of the popularity that a vegetarian restaurant can receive by focusing its efforts towards a collective audience.

January of this year saw a mass of high-profile restaurants trying out full vegan menus or dishes for ‘Veganuary’. Harvey Nichols brought a full vegan menu to its OXO Tower restaurant in the shape of a three course vegan meal and vegan wine list. Upon opening their menu cover, guests were welcomed by the sights of Grilled Tofu with Miso and a Poached Pear and Blackberry Dessert.

tom-aitken-vegan-burger

Even Michelin Star chef, Tom Aitken took part in his Tom’s Kitchen restaurant . Teaming up with vegetarian burger company, The Vurger Co, he served up a hoisin glazed mushroom patty with pak choi, red cabbage and crunchy spring onions ( pictured above). Due to the success of this vegan burger, he has adopted a vegetarian burger to his main menu since then.

The amount of vegan festivals has seen a massive increase too, with at least 75 festivals lined up for 2018 in the UK alone. The festivals are a celebration of the natural lifestyle whilst also introducing its participants to new vegan restaurants and foods that they may not have tried before. Restaurants are creating pop ups at these events to promote themselves to the vegan following and gain some new supporters.

So, with the popularity of no-meat lifestyles on the rise, it is clear that restaurants have an opportunity to increase their offerings and enable themselves to appeal to a wider clientele. If 25% of evening meals being eaten are meat free, would restaurants do well to make 25% of their offerings meat free? It might even serve as a cost effective alternative whilst not compromising on quality.

Wayne Redge is marketing assistant, Smart Hospitality Supplies

Food additives are a cause of obesity, says Mike Duckett MBE FIH

focus-on-hospital-food-and-on-the-way-forward-by-mike-duckett-mbe-fih-1
Mike Duckett MBE FIH, centre, meets HRH The Prince of Wales

The hospitality industry has a responsibility to promote healthy eating habits, writes Mike Duckett MBE FIH, the ambassador for good hospital food and the former award-winning head of catering at The Royal Brompton Hospital, London.

“I have always worried about the amount of chemical additives added to food during manufacturing and the number of alien ingredients used to extend the colour and the shelf life of food, especially ready frozen meals. I have been very vocal in expressing my concerns which were confirmed recently when I visited the local hospital here in Surrey.

I was disturbed to hear of two eight-year-old boys who were hospitalised with severe pain from type-one diabetes. The senior nurse on duty told me that the main cause was their poor diet and lack of a variety of healthy food.

We therefore as the hospitality fraternity  have a collective responsibility to ensure that the food we serve is healthier.  We should persuade those who manufacture meals to be more aware of the steps needed to reducing high levels of obesity.

Statistics show that we are eating out more regularly and that we tend to eat more in a restaurant than in the home environment. This raises one important question. How safe is it to eat out these days? Recently we have heard that a major meat supplier was told by the FSA to stop supplying, a popular pub chain received a zero rating for hygiene,  and food factories change best before dates on food.  We also hear of customers dying from eating food that cause allergies. It makes you wonder if eating out is taking your life in their hands.

Hospitals, care homes, meals on wheels services and the general public are in the habit of purchasing  ready frozen microwave meals. These meals are high in fat, sugar and salt. Scientists have warned that emulsifiers – the chemicals widely used in processed foods including ice cream, bread and chocolate – may be a key cause of obesity. These emulsifiers are used to make smoother textures in foods such as peanut butter, sausages and mayonnaise. They are understood to be chemically active long after we digest them and they increase hunger and therefore we eat more.

If we are going to take the growing obesity epidemic seriously, we need an urgent look at what is being used in our food manufacturing and in the type of food and ready meals we serve our customers and campaign for the use of fresh local ingredients from as near the point of service as possible.”

trivago Awards 2018: Top-rated UK Hotels

trivago Awards - Top-rated hotels in the UK

Hotel search website and Business Partner of the Institute of Hospitality trivago releases the results of its annual trivago Awards, using over 175 million aggregated hotel reviews to determine the best-rated hotels in the UK.

This year, the top-rated hotels have been awarded across six different categories: 5-star, 4-star, 3-star, Alternative Accommodation, Value for Money and Chain Hotel.

“As an independent source of hotel information with data on over 175 million guest reviews, we are well-positioned to identify the top-rated hotels that excel at delivering exceptional guest experiences,” says Johannes Thomas, Managing Director of trivago N.V. “The trivago Awards give us the chance to recognise and honour the hard-working hoteliers behind these exemplary hotels, and we are thrilled to do so again this year.”

The Arthington Guest House - Blackpool

The award for the best alternative accommodation goes to The Arthington Guest House in Blackpool (pictured above) which was awarded also last year. Stephen Fazakerley cites their guests as the source of success: “A big thank you to all the guests both old and new who have posted reviews about us. We would not be a success without them.“

Hotel 41 - London

London’s Hotel 41 is the best 5-star hotel in the UK  (pictured above) according to their guests’ online reviews, making it a trivago Award winner for the second year in a row. Edward Boulton, Digital Marketing Manager, acknowledges the team for providing an exceptional service to their guests: “Our team go above and beyond to provide five-star service to each and every guest, ensuring that a stay at Hotel 41 is remembered for more than just the luxurious décor.”

The Clontarf Hotel - Llandudno

This year, the top-rated 4-star hotel is The Clontarf in Llandudno (pictured above) followed by The View at The White Horse Woolley Moor and La Place in Saint Aubin.

Cedar Manor - Windermere

Cedar Manor in Windermere (pictured above) is recognised as the best 3-star hotel in the UK and the best value for money can be found at St Michael’s Guest House in Scarborough.

The top-rated hotels within the most popular hotel chains in the UK are The Montcalm London Marble Arch, The Principal York and Laura Ashley The Manor.

For further insights and more detailed information about the winning hotels as well as the top-rated 10 hotels in each category in the UK, visit the trivago Hotel Manager Blog

 

HQ Magazine Autumn 2017 out now

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Your autumn edition of HQ Magazine has arrived in the UK and been dispatched to the rest of the world. It is available to view on our website now.

In this issue, our cover feature is on how to close the gender gap in hospitality. Globally, 70% of hospitality and tourism workers are female, and yet men hold the vast majority of management and board positions.

More women than men gain university degrees and women earn more than men early in their careers. But the situation starts to reverse when people get into their mid-thirties. Sometimes the pay gap appears because women take time off to have children. Sometimes they get ‘stuck’ at a particular level.

Tracey Fairclough MIH presents brand-new research based upon interviews with 100 women from our sector and, most importantly, provides a new road map towards achieving greater equality.

We report from an Institute of Hospitality roundtable discussion of GDPR and present the best ways to prepare for the new data protection laws that come into force in May 2018. Our participants found that GDPR is actually a good opportunity to spring-clean their data and re-think their marketing strategies.

Other topics covered this autumn include preparing chefs for the open kitchen environment, job-jumping and what it means for career progression and the new health-conscisousness sweeping through hospitality.

Editor Ben Walker AIH says: “I am encouraged to see so many of our members taking the initiative to get in touch and contribute excellent articles to the magazine. The majority of our magazine is generated by members for members. My warmest thanks go to all of our marvellous contributors. A big thank you also to our designer Miranda Willan at H2O Publishing for an especially eye-catching cover.”

Members can view the magazine by logging into the members’ area of our website.

If you are not a member, please join the Institute of Hospitality now to receive your copy of HQ Magazine.
Here is a free download from the current issue:

Report from Institute of Hospitality Roundtable on GDPR