Media coverage for Planday Brexit survey

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Earlier this month (12 June) the Institute partnered with workforce collaboration software company Planday to launch their YouGov survey of hospitality managers and staff to find out how prepared they are for Brexit and what impact they think it will have on their business and jobs.

The media coverage from the launch was highly successful, with a total number of 42 pieces of both online and broadcast media. Our chief executive Peter Ducker FIH took part in a total of 13 radio interviews with stations such as BBC Radio Scotland and Jazz FM, with a reach of over 2.4 million people.

There was a total of 29 pieces of editorial coverage, including Press Association, the selective newswire service which feeds the British media, alongside online coverage in the Independent.

The survey received strong pick-up across the hospitality and HR trade media, such as The CatererBig HospitalityHotel OwnerHospitality & Catering News and Boutique Hotelier, some of which included insights from the Planday Brexit Survival Guide.

The coverage did not stop at just the UK, as the research was picked up globally in the US, India, Indonesia, Germany, South Africa, France, Sweden, Portugal, and even included an article in Welsh.

All members will receive a printed copy the Brexit Survival Guide with their copy of HQ Magazine this July. The guide is packed with smart tips on recruitment, retention and staff engagement.

Download your Brexit Survival Guide here

 

 

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Recruiting for a major new opening

How do you plan and execute a recruitment campaign for a high-profile new hotel business?  Directors of people development at the Principal Hotel London, Sean Wheeler MIH and Melanie Price, talk us through building up to 400 new employees from scratch

The former Russell Hotel, an iconic property in London’s Bloomsbury, re-opened on 16 April after almost two years of closure for refurbishment. (Following a deal with IHG, the hotel is due to change its name again later this year).

What happened to the Hotel Russell employees?

Melanie: The old hotel closed in July 2016, so obviously because of the period of time we were going to be closed, we had to put everyone into redundancy and they all left. We have one lady who still works for us and one individual who came back, but apart from that the rest of the team are new.

At what stage is the new opening?

Sean: We’re probably 25% there. We’ve opened 100 bedrooms but we still have 230 to open; we’ve opened the bar and coffee shop, but there is still the restaurant, the palm court afternoon tea venue, ballroom and meeting and events space to open. There’s still quite a bit to do!

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How far in advance did you plan your recruitment?

Melanie: We had a plan on paper and a plan in our minds but the project was unfortunately delayed a couple of times, which is quite normal. We probably didn’t start our mass recruitment until mid to late February. We recruited our 50-strong team of senior people a good year ago. So far we have recruited 150 people in total.

What channels do you use?

Melanie: We use the Caterer and various other sources, friends, contacts, colleagues. The initial 50 senior people were recommended to us which is important. A lot of people want to do an opening. They’ve read the publicity about the investment and the refurbishment. Our culture and the type of person we recruit is important to us.

For our front-line staff, we did a social media campaign which we found very useful. We’re proud that we probably only recruited half a dozen through agencies.

Sean: We only started the social media campaign in January. In three months we reached 420,000 people and managed to get 14,000 click-throughs to the vacancy page. We targeted the different groups of people we were trying to reach: people working in restaurants, bars, coffee shops, hotels, also some independent restaurants. We work with a company that helps us target certain youth groups.

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What kind of people have you recruited?

Melanie: We’ve got a real mixture. In our coffee shop you’re going to get a much more casual look in there, quite quirky people. They’ve got tattoos, different hairstyles, their uniform is a denim shirt. But then in the Palm Court we have a much more formal look. We’re really proud that we’ve got a real mixture, very diverse. We made sure we recruited for each outlet and that that the people are right for the outlet.

Sean: One of our values is ‘local at heart’ so one of the key things for us is connecting with the local community. In Bloomsbury, that is a very mixed group, so we have the coffee shop, the cocktail bar and the afternoon tea venue. We are trying to attract different types of guests at different times of the day and match the employees to the different types of clientele.

Melanie: Another of our values is warmth and we are particularly keen to make sure the team are warm and welcoming. We have looked outside the box. Some people we have given an opportunity to. They may not necessarily have all the right experience, but they’ve got the personality and warmth. We have some real characters working for us with some interesting backgrounds.

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Was exhibiting at the Passion4Hospitality Careers Fair useful to you?

Melanie: We got one or two concrete leads. Obviously a lot of it is about getting our name out there, so events like that are important. This is our only hotel in London. We have been mainly northern-based so we really have to go out there and establish ourselves and also remind people that we are changing from what the hotel was before.

Is it just people already working you recruit? How about school leavers or graduates?

We have good relationships with schools, colleges and universities. We’re very much open to people with different skills. For them to further develop their careers, it’s more about their culture and personality.

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What happens now?

Melanie: We will have 400 staff once completely open. That shouldn’t be reached until September 2019. We are very hopeful that all our revenues are going to be absolutely fantastic and we’re very positive about that. We will take on another 100 staff before the end of May. It is something we need to do gradually because we are only getting our rooms back gradually. We have another five floors to come back. Having 400 staff walk through the door all at the same time would be very difficult to manage. We make sure everyone goes through their two-day induction, they get re-training, and that training continues on their journey with us.

Sean: We’ve had a lot of great comments on trip advisor about our people. Our values are generous, intuitive, warm, distinctive, and local at heart. The team are actively recruiting for these values. Melanie has done a great job to find so many people who have these values, and she has done it in a very short space of time.

Do you do face-to-face interviews or something more rapid?

Melanie: In the early days with the senior team, we did one-to-one interviews.  We’ve had a lot of open days since. Everyone will always see a member of the people development team and the head of their department. We’ve done that with every person that we have offered positions to. It’s making sure we’re comfortable. It’s about the future candidate meeting more than one person. We think that’s a useful benefit for them.

Interview by Ben Walker AIH

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HQ explores the talent pipeline

001_HQ_SPRING_2018_SPINE.pdfYour latest issue of HQ (second quarter 2018 issue 48) is landing on UK doormats this week. It explores the talent pipeline from a number of perspectives.

Where is our next generation of leaders and senior managers coming from? It is a question often asked  in hospitality management and education circles. Your latest issue of HQ Magazine is packed with answers and opinions on the matter.

Our chief executive Peter Ducker FIH is impressed with the talented and enthusiastic young hospitality management students coming out of universities and colleges. It is up to all of us to ensure they find ways to achieve their full potential within our sector and that we do not lose them to other industries, he says.

Still just 32-years-old, Adam Rowledge FIH is a rising leader on the UK hotel management scene and a superb role-model for new entrants. Our in-depth interview showcases the importance of creating the right culture within the workplace that allows talent to grow and shine.

A UK government review into higher education is now underway, concerned about choice and value for money within a system where almost all institutions are charging the same price for courses. The review may mean some tourism and hospitality courses will either need to change their approaches radically or risk becoming obsolete, says John Swarbrooke of Plymouth University

Of course, a university degree is by no means the only route into a successful hospitality management career. Sue Williams FIH MI, current Hotelier of the Year, is just one of hundreds of professionals who started their careers with the Concord hotel management programme.  Celebrating its 50th anniversary, Glen Harrison MIH reveals all about this unique on-the-job training scheme which specifically targets youngsters coming out of FE colleges who do not want to go to university.

Other contents in this HQ Magazine

  • Peter Jones MBE FIH – Why has the government dropped the T level in hospitality?
  • Passion4Hospitality 2018 – re-live the excitement of our largest ever student and industry networking event
  • The end of business as usual – Angela Roper FIH on vertical disintegration in the corporate hotel industry
  • A winning partnership – how Sheffield Hallam University and Hilton are working closely together
  • Cybercrime and GDPR – what businesses need to do to protect themselves
  • Tableware trends – creativity is all the rage but weird, wacky (and unhygienic) are definitely out

 

 

Gender balanced management teams make for safer and more engaged employees, Sodexo study finds

Sodexo GenderBalanceStudyInfographic

Study of 50,000 Sodexo employees finds teams with gender diversity achieve better results across the board

International services company Sodexo has found teams managed by a balanced mix of men and women are more successful across a range of measurements including employee engagement and health and safety.

The five-year study of 70 Sodexo entities across different functions represents 50,000 managers worldwide and tested the performance implications of gender-inclusive work culture. The study examined women across all levels of management – not just upper-level leadership positions – in order to investigate the “pipeline” that will ultimately affect gender balance at the top tier of businesses.

Sodexo’s study found that non-financial factors can also significantly benefit from a more equally structured leadership, with benefits including;

Gender-balanced management reported an employee engagement rate that was 14 percentage points higher than other entities

Gender-balanced entities saw the number of accidents decrease by 12 percentage points more than other entities.

Gender-balanced entities had an average client retention rate that was 9 percentage points higher than other entities.

Gender-balanced entities had an average employee retention rate that was 8 percentage points higher than other entities

Operating margins significantly increased among more gender-balanced teams than other teams.

The pattern of results indicated that a near-equal balance of men and women in management was critical to observing gains in financial and non-financial KPIs. Once the proportion of women in management exceeded 60%, the benefits plateaued, confirming that a mix between 40% and 60% is necessary for optimal performance.

Analysts also found a direct correlation between the percentage of women in the total workforce and those in management, indicating gender-balanced workforces and leadership create an environment supportive of career growth for women. This lends support to the idea that gender parity in top leadership is closely related to the pipeline of women in the workforce.

Sodexo, already a leader in diversity & inclusion, is breaking new ground in gender parity. Today, women represent 50% of its board. Thirty-two percent of senior leadership positions are held by women globally – a 6% increase at the very top levels since 2013.

Middle management and site management positions are balanced at 46%. Currently, 59% of the total workforce works within gender-balanced management.

The Sodexo Gender Balance Study originated in 2014 with Sodexo’s desire to improve its gender parity in leadership throughout the management of its 425,000 global workforce and to expand previous outside research on gender parity in the workplace.

The full report can be accessed here: http://bit.ly/2tmBIbm

 

 

Quality employers support Passion4Hospitality 2018

untitledThe eighth edition of Passion4Hospitality, the Institute of Hospitality’s annual student and industry networking event, benefited from an extensive Careers Fair featuring nearly 40 companies looking for new talent.

Around 300 hospitality management students attended the all-day event which took place at Novotel London West on Monday (12 March). Students came from UK universities and colleges and from Stenden University in the Netherlands. They gained a wealth of advice on landing the right job during the interactive conference programme. They also had time to take full advantage of the excellent Careers Fair to make contact with the high-quality employers who are actively recruiting.

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Represented at The Careers Fair were Royal Automobile Club, Victory Services Club, Shangri-La at the Shard, Georgian House, The Ritz, Dorchester Collection, Four Seasons Hotel London at Park Lane, Doyle Collection/The Bloomsbury, BaxterStorey, Evolve Hospitality, Novotel London West, Sarova Hotels, Foxhills, Gravetye Manor, Bespoke Hotels, Edition Hotels, Nadler Hotels, Hyatt, Waldorf Hilton, Iconic Luxury Hotels Group, The Savoy, Harbour Hotels Group, CH&Co, Splendid Hospitality, Exclusive Hotels and Venues, Catapult, Jurys Inn, Dorsett Hotels, Mandarin Oriental, Como Hotels and Resorts, SpaYse International, The Principal London, National Careers Service, Hospitality Assured, Dukes Collection, and Firmdale.

The HOTS Business Game runners-up from Stenden, Holland

Teams from six universities competed in the HOTS Business Game competition to run a virtual resort hotel. The winning team (above) was from Glion Institute of Higher Education, London. The runners-up came from Stenden University in the Netherlands. The University of Brighton came in third place. The competition was administered by Peter Russell MIH of the Russell Partnership.

Peter Ducker FIH, chief executive, Institute of Hospitality, introduced the event by telling students: “No one will ever care about your career as much as you do, so the sooner you start planning and setting yourself goals, the better.”

Get that job!

During a panel discussion, students were advised on how to stand out. Match the tone and message of your covering letter to the vacancy, said Shona Rye, director, Your Invisible Partner. Use social media as a research tool and go into the interview armed with information about the company, so that you are well-prepared when asked to contribute questions at the end of your interview, said Martin Smith, Collins King & Associates. Do not simply send in your CV and wait for a reply, said Neil Graham, managing director, SpaYse International. A follow-up phone call will help, and during the interview itself, recruiters are interested in personality.

Diversity dilemma

Asked whether she was in favour of quotas for female managers in hospitality, Debrah Dhugga FIH MI, managing director, Dukes Collection, replied: “I would never want to be given a job just because I was a woman.”

She added she would like to see more women at executive level: “A diverse board room generates a richness, a wider viewpoint in a world where women are increasingly a powerful force as consumers and business leaders.”

Diverse workplaces in general have advantages in terms of attaining customer loyalty, she said: “Value everyone in your organisation. Diversity refers to age, disability, religion, gender and more, and goes beyond just legal compliance. International work experience is of value and managers must be ready to harness the diversity of the workforce.”

Spotlight on the sectors

20180312_0528This panel discussion highlighted some of the lesser-known areas of employment in hospitality such as foodservice and private members clubs. Mark Field FIH, operations director, The Victory Services Club said that he found working in members clubs to be “a tremendous working environment where I can use my skills as a hotelier.” Jessica Berry, talent manager for The Doyle Collection, highlighted the similarities between her current role in human resources and her previous experience in event management. Delphine Delacroix AIH, MICE office manager at Novotel London West, added that working in events means that no two days are ever the same.

Adam Rowledge FIH, general manager, Georgian House, provided an extremely well-devised and useful A-Z of personal brand promotion. Using video well will give you a huge advantage on social media, he said, and concluded his presentation with a quote from Charles Buxton: “Experience shows that success is due less to ability than to zeal.”

Breaking the ice

Rory Kelly-Naughton, hotels business manager, Evolve, provided expert advice on networking. “Make contacts and then maintain them. I got my job with Evolve because I know the owner, even after six years. ”

Peter Ducker FIH concluded: “Passion4Hospitality is a highlight in our calendar and I always come away feeling inspired and energised. The speakers gave their time freely to help make today possible. My thanks to them; to all our sponsors; to the exhibitors at the Careers Fair; and also to Michael Sloan FIH and his team at the Novotel London West for their generosity as venue sponsors.”

Sponsors

The headline sponsor of Passion4Hospitality 2018 was Planday. The other sponsors were arena4finance, aslotel, the Council for Hospitality Management Education (CHME), Critiquie, Fresh Montgomery, Glion, HOTS, Novotel, Savoy Educational Trust, Stenden, SpaYse International.

 

35 of UK’s Top 100 restaurant groups now loss-making – up 75% in just a year

  • Oversaturated market, minimum wage hike put pressure on restaurants
  • Another minimum wage rise just weeks away

35 of the UK’s Top 100 restaurant groups are now loss-making, up 75% from just 20 last year, shows research by UHY Hacker Young, the national accountancy group.
UHY Hacker Young says that trading conditions have become increasingly difficult for restaurant chains dealing with oversaturation in the market as well as rising costs.
The firm adds that this research comes on the back of the high-profile struggles of several major restaurant chains in recent weeks, including:

  • Jamie’s Italian, started by Jamie Oliver, which has closed 12 branches as part of a Company Voluntary Arrangement (CVA) to restructure its £71.5m debt
  • Byron, the burger chain, which may close up to 20 of its 67 branches following a period of paying reduced rent
  • Prezzo, the Italian chain, which is expected to close some of its 300 branches as part of a restructuring
  • Strada, another Italian chain, which closed 11 branches over the festive period
  • Barbecoa, another Jamie Oliver chain, which entered administration in mid-February
  • EAT, the sandwich chain, which was rumoured in early February to be considering closing some of its 100 branches

UHY Hacker Young says that pressures of competing with numerous similar ‘fast casual’ restaurants in an overcrowded high street are a major driver of many large restaurant groups registering losses over the past year.

It adds that the National Minimum wage, which has risen by an above-inflation 19% to £7.50 per hour over the last five years, has added a substantial cost burden to large restaurant chains. From April 2018, the minimum wage will rise even further to £7.83.

Peter Kubik, Partner at UHY Hacker Young, comments: “More than a third of the biggest companies in the restaurant sector are losing money, and there is little respite on the horizon.”

“Pressures on the restaurant sector have been building for years, and the last year has pushed a number of major groups to breaking point.”

“With Brexit hanging over consumers like a dark cloud, restaurants can’t expect a bailout from a surge in discretionary spending.”

“Consumers only have a finite amount of spending power when it comes to eating out, and the oversaturation of the market means that groups that fall foul of changing trends can very easily fail.”

“The Government has ratcheted up costs with a series of above-inflation rises in the minimum wage, and we are just weeks away from another 4.4% rise in April. That will be tough for a lot of restaurants to absorb.”

About UHY Hacker Young:

 The UHY Hacker Young Group is one of the UK’s Top 15 accountancy networks with 110 partners and more than 620 professional staff working from 22 locations around the country. The offices within the Group provide a wide range of accounting, tax and business advisory services, with a reputation for integrity and reliability within the financial community, and particularly with London’s Stock Markets. UHY Hacker Young are also ranked 15th in the ARL Corporate Advisers Rankings Guide amongst other UK audit firms for advising London Stock Exchange listed companies.

UHY Hacker Young is a founder member of the UHY International network with offices in every major financial centre in the world. Further information can be found at www.uhy-uk.com

 

Quotas for female managers?

On International Women’s Day (8 March), Serena von der Heyde FIH MI makes the case for affirmative action to achieve greater diversity in the boardrooms of the hospitality industry19 Serena von der Hyde FIH

Like a lot of people, I don’t like quotas – I don’t think they are fair – but recently I have started to think again. Nearly 60% of the UK workforce in our industry are women yet only just over 20% of our managers are women, and these figures have been almost static for more than 20 years.  We know that businesses with more women leaders are more successful and more profitable, so why aren’t companies rushing to develop and promote them?  The benefits of diversity are proven, but still progress in achieving diversity is glacially slow.

We want a fair workplace for our young women and men, and optimum performance for our businesses, and yet a compelling business case has failed to bring about change; then should we consider quotas?

Quotas have been shown to get results, and fast.  They have been used across Europe to promote women in politics and business since Norway started in 2003.  Many countries including Iceland, France, Spain and now Germany have followed suit, and the numbers of board-level women have risen in those countries. What’s more, there is some evidence that where quotas have been in use for some time, diversity becomes self-fulfilling. The culture and infrastructure has changed to the extent that women and men are coming through to leadership levels in equal numbers. In Belgium, the quota system states that both sexes must be represented for applications for roles in politics, and recently it is male applicants that have been hard to recruit. For quotas to work, they need to come with strict repercussions. In France, businesses were threatened with de-regulation if they failed to meet quotas. In Spain there were no sanctions for not meeting quotas, and as a result Spain has been far less successful. Quotas without teeth are ineffective.

One of the main arguments against quotas is that they prevent promotion on merit. We want the best leaders for our businesses regardless of gender. But I challenge the notion that our meritocracy is working. If it was, wouldn’t we already have more women leaders? The truth is that our societal and cultural background is failing to provide a level playing field for our aspiring women leaders.  More women than men are graduating from our universities, and, on average, women have better grade degrees, but still we overlook their talents.  It is becoming clear that we have to learn diversity – it takes time for a culture to genuinely believe in the value of diversity, and then to implement processes that nurture it.

There is a difference between quotas and targets, in terms of delivering change; quotas enforce where targets incentivise. Personally, I believe that people learn better and change more when they can set their own agenda. Every business will have different issues affecting diversity, and real change is most effective when a strategy is developed specifically by the team for that business.  When regulations are imposed, teams spend half their efforts working on strategies to sidestep the new rules, and quotas can result in alienating the team.

For my own business, where we need to develop male leaders to ensure diversity, I will be:

  • Ensuring full and ongoing commitment to diversity from the leadership
  • Leading the development of our diversity strategy and targets
  • Publishing gender pay differences, and recording gender balance across the team and our leadership team

This type of approach gives businesses time to develop a pipeline of talented women (or in our case men), so that they can make quality appointments and showcase successful women within the business. I believe that hospitality businesses should be recording gender balance, monitoring gender pay gaps and publishing their own targets and strategy for diversity.  However, if these initiatives prove inadequate, then it is time to consider resorting to the faster, but blunter tool of quotas.

Serena von der Heyde FIH MI is the owner of The Georgian House Hotel, London

Sign up to the Diversity in Hospitality, Travel and Leisure Charter here.