Understanding the impact of Brexit on housekeeping teams. Take part in important research by People 1st

People-1st-Logo-ptpThere is still significant uncertainty about the extent to which employers will be able to recruit skilled and unskilled labour from the EU, when the UK leaves in 2019.

Businesses need time to prepare, particularly in those areas that currently rely on a high proportion of other EU workers. Anecdotally, hotel and accommodation providers are increasingly concerned about the possible impact of Brexit on housekeeping teams, given the high proportion of EU nationals currently employed in this area. A challenge facing the sector is that official figures suggests that migrant workers make up only 28% of the housekeeping workforce, which could downplay the potential impact on the sector.

We believe that the official figures significantly underestimate the number of migrant workers employed in housekeeping roles and are urgently undertaking research with hotel and accommodation providers to identify:

  • The extent to which their housekeeping teams employ migrant workers and are therefore susceptible to any restrictions imposed on recruiting EU workers post-Brexit
  • The extent to which recruitment and retention of housekeeping teams has been affected since the referendum
  • Possible ways in which employers are considering recruiting and retaining housekeeping teams post-Brexit.

The results will be shared with employers and industry organisations, as well as with government to help inform understanding about the needs of the hospitality sector in the run-up to the UK leaving the EU.

The research is being conducted by People 1st in January 2018 for release in early February. If you want to participate and share your views please contact Martin-Christian Kent on 07770733393 or martin-christian.kent@people1st.co.uk

 

Advertisements

The Menu Museum

menu museum logo large(1)A Brighton-based academic is bringing a unique archive of menus to the attention of the wider international hospitality industry and education practitioners with the aim that it will remain free to users and continue to grow.

The Menu Museum is an interactive online menu archive that facilitates research and teaching in menu design, pricing and food and beverage trends. It currently features more than 640 menus and has over 1,500 users.

Ioannis Pantelidis FIH, principal lecturer in hospitality and culinary arts at the University of Brighton, started the website with his colleague Ken Woodward. Pantelidis says: “I had a big collection of restaurant menus that I was using for food and beverage management-related modules, so I had numerous folders that I used to carry to my classes. When I came to Brighton I started teaching a module with Ken. He had his own collection, so when we put the two together we had about 500 menus which we scanned and uploaded onto the website. Since then a further 140 menus have been uploaded by users, which is great.”

The collection includes a menu replica from the Titanic (1912) and a 19th century menu from the Dorchester Hotel, London.  Menus can be searched for by country and year of origin. Once registered, users can upload their own menus or collections of menus.

Pantelidis adds that the website continues to be a work in progress and wants to bring it to the wider attention of the international hospitality community in order for it to grow.

The website can be an important teaching aid. Pantelidis has used it to compare a 1970s Dorchester menu with its equivalent today. He says: Students are able to explore the differences – how the pricing strategies differ, the design and the types of dishes on the menu. I want to keep the website free and I want the community to use it.”

The Menu Museum won the 2017 Teaching Innovation Award,  presented by
The Council of Hospitality Management Education, in association with the SHARE center.

The Menu Museum received initial funding from the European Union. Subsequently both the Savoy Educational Trust and Trigger Solutions have helped with server hosting and maintenance costs.

For further information about supporting the Menu Museum, please contact:
Dr Ioannis S. Pantelidis FIH – Principal Lecturer
Admissions, recruitment, marketing & WP leader
School of Sport and Service Management
University of Brighton,  Darley Road, Eastbourne, BN20 7UR
Tel:  +44 1273 64 4748   Email: isp12@brighton.ac.uk

HQ Magazine Autumn 2017 out now

001_HQ_AUTUMN_2017_1

Your autumn edition of HQ Magazine has arrived in the UK and been dispatched to the rest of the world. It is available to view on our website now.

In this issue, our cover feature is on how to close the gender gap in hospitality. Globally, 70% of hospitality and tourism workers are female, and yet men hold the vast majority of management and board positions.

More women than men gain university degrees and women earn more than men early in their careers. But the situation starts to reverse when people get into their mid-thirties. Sometimes the pay gap appears because women take time off to have children. Sometimes they get ‘stuck’ at a particular level.

Tracey Fairclough MIH presents brand-new research based upon interviews with 100 women from our sector and, most importantly, provides a new road map towards achieving greater equality.

We report from an Institute of Hospitality roundtable discussion of GDPR and present the best ways to prepare for the new data protection laws that come into force in May 2018. Our participants found that GDPR is actually a good opportunity to spring-clean their data and re-think their marketing strategies.

Other topics covered this autumn include preparing chefs for the open kitchen environment, job-jumping and what it means for career progression and the new health-conscisousness sweeping through hospitality.

Editor Ben Walker AIH says: “I am encouraged to see so many of our members taking the initiative to get in touch and contribute excellent articles to the magazine. The majority of our magazine is generated by members for members. My warmest thanks go to all of our marvellous contributors. A big thank you also to our designer Miranda Willan at H2O Publishing for an especially eye-catching cover.”

Members can view the magazine by logging into the members’ area of our website.

If you are not a member, please join the Institute of Hospitality now to receive your copy of HQ Magazine.
Here is a free download from the current issue:

Report from Institute of Hospitality Roundtable on GDPR

 

 

 

 

Institute to share high-quality research with industry

9 Maria Gebbels MIH
Lecturers, including Maria Gebbels MIH at the University of Greenwich, are encouraging their students to submit research to the Insitute of Hospitality Digest


Calling all hospitality management students. Have your coursework published in the Institute of Hospitality Digest and share it with industry leaders ( first edition deadline is 16 October).

The Institute of Hospitality Digest will be a new online collection of the very best research by student members studying at our international community of universities and colleges. We are now accepting submissions for the first edition.

The aim of the Institute of Hospitality Digest is to collect the very best academic research and share it with the Institute’s wider community of operators and managers.

The Institute’s chief executive Peter Ducker FIH says: “We hope that the Institute of Hospitality Digest plays a role in bringing academia and industry closer together and encourages colleges to undertake research that has a practical application for today’s and tomorrow’s managers.”

The Digest has been welcomed by lecturers. Dr Maria Gebbels MIH, Lecturer in Hospitality Management at the University of Greenwich, says: “This is a brilliant idea and I hope that our students will be excited to share their dissertation research on this e-platform.”

Cora Huen, Head of Program, Division of Tourism and Hospitality, Hong Kong College of Technology, says: “This idea is indeed an effective platform for institutions to showcase the employability credentials of their students.”

Professor Brian King, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, says: “Our students will be greatly encouraged to know that such an outlet is available to disseminate their work.”

The Institute has 75 universities and colleges on its Education Membership Scheme, adding up to more than 3,000 student members across the world.

The Institute of Hospitality Digest welcomes your submissions.
Submit your research now.
Download the submission guidelines

 

New research into wine ordering

eurochrie-research-winnerThe winners of the Institute of Hospitality Education Research Award 2016 at last year’s EuroCHRIE conference in Budapest were Henri Kuokkanen MIH  (pictured right) and Carlos da Silva MIH for their research into the future of wine ordering in restaurants

Wine can be a source of great pleasure. Yet consumers may perceive selecting wine a risk, and particularly in restaurants the choice can create stress. The solid reputation of a restaurant eases such concerns when patrons can seek advice from expert staff. When combined perfectly with food, wine elevates a meal experience to a new level. Thus wine selection is an essential component of customer experience, and the assistance a restaurant offers is critical.

A wine steward, or sommelier, acts as a facilitator in wine purchases by providing sensory descriptions of wines. While a sommelier directly boosts wine sales, he or she also indirectly augments wine revenue through better staff training. Customers generally perceive extended interaction with staff positively, generating further benefits from hiring a sommelier.

Employing trained sommeliers inevitably increases costs. In an attempt to enhance customer experience without this cost, some restaurants have replaced traditional paper wine lists with electronic tablets.

Tablets as food menus show promise in enhancing the service experience of a customer by providing extended information, but the potential of combining food and wine orders on tablets has yet to be tested. Tablets are beneficial when customers perceive value in them, and wine suggestions may be included in these tools. Restaurant revenue management may also benefit from the use of technology. However, the special role of wine in creating a dining experience calls for extra attention to how wine itself is presented; it should not merely be treated as a sub-component of the food menu.

To read more (the article The Wine Tablet Experience in the current issue of HQ Magazine, the Institute of Hospitality official publication), click here
For the full research paper, please contact Henri Kuokkanen MIH, research and education, Switzerland, email: henri.kuokkanen@gmail.com

Institute Announces New Webinar Season

The Institute of Hospitality launches its new season of webinars with an American perspective on ‘Brexit’s silver lining’. 

For American visitors to the UK, prices are now 30% lower than two years ago thanks to the sharp drop in sterling triggered by the EU referendum result.  In the coming months, there are strong signs that the UK is set to enjoy record-beating levels of inbound tourism. How can operators capitalise on this boom?

Peter Ducker, chief executive, Institute of Hospitality, says: “American tourists have always been our biggest spenders. Now that they will be arriving in greater numbers, there is no better time to fine-tune our customer service skills in order to wow guests and keep them coming back.  We are delighted to kick-start our webinar season with Simon Hudson, a distinguished hospitality expert from the University of South Carolina, who will deliver his unique insights into what American tourists are looking for.”

Institute of Hospitality webinars give busy hospitality professionals a full briefing on a current operational topic in 30-40 minutes. You can also ask questions and receive follow-up materials. Full programme below.

Institute of Hospitality Webinars Autumn 2016

6 September
Capitalising on Brexit’s Silver Lining
The whys and hows of training employees to wow American tourists in order to secure long-term lucrative loyalty
Dr Simon Hudson, College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management, University of South Carolina

20 September
We have data but how can we use it?
On average a hotel receives data from more than 12 systems everyday. Get some great tips on how to use this data while still remaining a hotelier and focusing on taking care of guests
Janel Clark, head of consultancy and education, Snapshot

4 October
Make the OTAs work for you
Learn how to embrace the role of OTAS, reduce the commission you pay, adopt an OTA strategy where you are in control and invest wisely in your hotel website
Andrew Plant, digital marketing manager, Journey

18 October
Food Allergens and Customer Excellence
The Food Allergen HACCP and due diligence framework not only helps protect your business but also appeals to a critically wary customer base, who above all want transparency and deserve service excellence like any other customer.
Julian Edwards MIH, director, Allergen Accreditation

1 November
Addressing the risk of human trafficking
The nature and necessities of human trafficking place hotel businesses in a high level of exposure. Identify the vulnerabilities in your business and discover what you can do to prevent, mitigate or eliminate the risk of human trafficking in your business.
Professor Angela Roper FIH, University of West London, and Dr Maureen Brookes, Oxford Brookes University

15 November
The effect of Brexit on employment and immigration rights
What’s the position now and what might change? What are the lessons from the Byron Hamburgers furore this summer? Find out how businesses can get ahead of potential changes.
Jonathan Gray, hospitality, tourism and leisure partner, Pitmans LLP

VisitBritain Market Selector tool helps hospitality businesses identify international markets

Does your business know which international markets look the most promising when it comes to attracting customers?

VisitBritain’s new interactive tool can help you determine which international markets might find your product most appealing – whether you operate accommodation, a pub or a restaurant, manage an attraction or even offer transport services . By specifying 3 categories using the online tool – business type, region/post code and popular area activities or offerings – the tool  calculates which markets look promising.The basis for the Market Selector tool’s outcomes are derived from VisitBritain’s valuable inbound international tourism data alongside their in-house market intelligence. Once you’ve input the 3 categories, VisitBritain’s tool provides you with the top markets for your business or region, based on volume and value. It couldn’t be easier!

For example, a pub in Dorking, Surrey – an area popular with walkers, cyclists and music festival attendees – would have particular appeal to the following international tourists:

Pubs in Dorking, Surrey, might want to focus their tourism marketing efforts on these international markets

In addition to identifying the best potential markets, there is a further link to ‘More Market Insights’ for each one of the identified markets. This detailed data can be particularly insightful about a new market. For example, Belgian visitors are primarily from Brussels, make their travel plans online and prefer 3* and 4* accommodation along with good food.

To identify new custom or to better understand your current customers, use VisitBritain’s new tool and Market Insights at: Market Selector tool