How restaurants are reacting to Vegetarian Month

March is vegetarian month. Recent news shows that an estimated 29% of evening meals in the UK are vegetarian or vegan. These numbers only seem to be increasing, but just how is the hospitality industry reacting? Wayne Redge reports

Reports show that sales of meat-free ready meals were up by 15% in January compared to 12 months before. Vegan numbers went up from 150,000 in 2006 to 540,000 just a decade later, with 1.2 million vegetarians in addition to this in the UK. Not only that, but there has been an uprising of ‘flexitarians’, those who reduce their meat consumption by choosing to have meat-free days. As a result, evidence shows that 25% of people in Britain have cut back on how much meat they eat. With all of these figures on the rise, the transitions to a meat-free way of living aren’t just a ‘fad’.

Signs of the hospitality industry acknowledging these statistics has come with many different reactions. Nando’s, the Afro-Portuguese chain restaurant known for its chicken, has been consistently adding to its range of vegetarian and vegan options over the past few years. The spiced chicken giant has now announced that two more vegetarian dishes will be added to its menu: golden brown halloumi sticks served with a pot of sweet chilli jam dip to start, alongside a new main of Veggie Cataplana (a South African inspired stew dish.)

A host of vegetarian restaurants are also popping up, giving people who have adopted this lifestyle a lot more options. Run by former mentee of Gordon Ramsay, Minal Patel, “Prashad” is a 2 rosette and Bib Gourmand standard Indian cuisine restaurant. The personalised and crafted menu boards created by Smart Hospitality encase an all vegetarian menu that has been the talk of popular review site, Trip Advisor, since the restaurant opened its doors. Receiving the “Most Talked About Restaurant On Trip Advisor Award” and a “Certificate of Excellence” on the site, it is proof of the popularity that a vegetarian restaurant can receive by focusing its efforts towards a collective audience.

January of this year saw a mass of high-profile restaurants trying out full vegan menus or dishes for ‘Veganuary’. Harvey Nichols brought a full vegan menu to its OXO Tower restaurant in the shape of a three course vegan meal and vegan wine list. Upon opening their menu cover, guests were welcomed by the sights of Grilled Tofu with Miso and a Poached Pear and Blackberry Dessert.


Even Michelin Star chef, Tom Aitken took part in his Tom’s Kitchen restaurant . Teaming up with vegetarian burger company, The Vurger Co, he served up a hoisin glazed mushroom patty with pak choi, red cabbage and crunchy spring onions ( pictured above). Due to the success of this vegan burger, he has adopted a vegetarian burger to his main menu since then.

The amount of vegan festivals has seen a massive increase too, with at least 75 festivals lined up for 2018 in the UK alone. The festivals are a celebration of the natural lifestyle whilst also introducing its participants to new vegan restaurants and foods that they may not have tried before. Restaurants are creating pop ups at these events to promote themselves to the vegan following and gain some new supporters.

So, with the popularity of no-meat lifestyles on the rise, it is clear that restaurants have an opportunity to increase their offerings and enable themselves to appeal to a wider clientele. If 25% of evening meals being eaten are meat free, would restaurants do well to make 25% of their offerings meat free? It might even serve as a cost effective alternative whilst not compromising on quality.

Wayne Redge is marketing assistant, Smart Hospitality Supplies


Single-use plastic-free hotel launches in Bangkok


With over 8 million tonnes of plastic thrown away each year and and the existence of the Great Pacific garbage patch, the world is waking up to the dangers of plastic waste.

Whilst supermarkets plan for plastic free aisles and coffee brands ditch the cup lids, Akaryn Hotel Group plan to become a single-use plastic free hotel group by 2020. The newest opening, akyra TAS Sukhumvit Bangkok, launching May 2018, is set to lead the charge in this initiative.

Effort has been made to source glass bottle containers and there are is no single-use plastic used in the bars. Stainless steel water bottles, which can be refilled anytime during their stay, are handed to guests on arrival. Self-service drinkable water will be conveniently located on every floor. Guests will notice that in the bathroom, toiletry products are presented in locally manufactured celadon containers filled with essential oils-based products. Bio-degradable bin bags are used in room and shopping bags can be borrowed from the wardrobes to encourage guests to refuse plastic bags when out shopping in Bangkok. 

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Food additives are a cause of obesity, says Mike Duckett MBE FIH

Mike Duckett MBE FIH, centre, meets HRH The Prince of Wales

The hospitality industry has a responsibility to promote healthy eating habits, writes Mike Duckett MBE FIH, the ambassador for good hospital food and the former award-winning head of catering at The Royal Brompton Hospital, London.

“I have always worried about the amount of chemical additives added to food during manufacturing and the number of alien ingredients used to extend the colour and the shelf life of food, especially ready frozen meals. I have been very vocal in expressing my concerns which were confirmed recently when I visited the local hospital here in Surrey.

I was disturbed to hear of two eight-year-old boys who were hospitalised with severe pain from type-one diabetes. The senior nurse on duty told me that the main cause was their poor diet and lack of a variety of healthy food.

We therefore as the hospitality fraternity  have a collective responsibility to ensure that the food we serve is healthier.  We should persuade those who manufacture meals to be more aware of the steps needed to reducing high levels of obesity.

Statistics show that we are eating out more regularly and that we tend to eat more in a restaurant than in the home environment. This raises one important question. How safe is it to eat out these days? Recently we have heard that a major meat supplier was told by the FSA to stop supplying, a popular pub chain received a zero rating for hygiene,  and food factories change best before dates on food.  We also hear of customers dying from eating food that cause allergies. It makes you wonder if eating out is taking your life in their hands.

Hospitals, care homes, meals on wheels services and the general public are in the habit of purchasing  ready frozen microwave meals. These meals are high in fat, sugar and salt. Scientists have warned that emulsifiers – the chemicals widely used in processed foods including ice cream, bread and chocolate – may be a key cause of obesity. These emulsifiers are used to make smoother textures in foods such as peanut butter, sausages and mayonnaise. They are understood to be chemically active long after we digest them and they increase hunger and therefore we eat more.

If we are going to take the growing obesity epidemic seriously, we need an urgent look at what is being used in our food manufacturing and in the type of food and ready meals we serve our customers and campaign for the use of fresh local ingredients from as near the point of service as possible.”

Institute of Hospitality Endorses Training Programmes for the Homeless

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Providence Row bakery trainees celebrate the endorsement of their training programme by the Institute of Hospitality.

The Institute of Hospitality has endorsed training programmes that help people affected by homelessness enter the catering industry and turn their lives around.

The catering and bakery training courses are provided by Providence Row, a charity that works with more than 1,400 homeless and vulnerably housed people a year in East London, offering an integrated service of crisis support, advice, recovery and learning and training.

Peter Ducker FIH, chief executive, Institute of Hospitality, says: “Endorsement by the Institute of Hospitality demonstrates that Providence Row’s training courses meet a wide range of essential criteria and benchmarks relating to quality standards and quality learning outcomes.”

Dominic Gates, Enterprise and Training Manager, Providence Row, says:  “We’re absolutely thrilled to gain this prestigious endorsement as it’s a fantastic acknowledgement of our team’s great work offering catering and baking training to people affected by homelessness, substance misuse and mental health issues. In the last seven years, we’ve developed a traditional ‘soup kitchen’ into a supported training kitchen, offering people quality training to help them move away from homelessness and back into employment.”

Providence Row Charity has been helping vulnerable people for 160 years. It has been running the Catering Trainee Scheme for the last seven years, having worked with over 200 trainees, food designers, and nutritionists and over 20 professional chefs at Andaz Hotel Liverpool Street and other catering establishments. Providence Row has two full-time chefs with catering backgrounds. In addition, Andaz Hotel Liverpool Street provides workshops and work experience placements for trainees.

The Institute of Hospitality offers an endorsement service to training providers for the recognition of quality professional development and training.