Institute of Hospitality welcomes payment specialist Lolly

PrintThe Institute of Hospitality announces a new business partnership with Lolly, a Point of Sale (PoS) and payments specialist serving small hospitality businesses across the UK: from coffee shops, pubs and night clubs, to mobile catering, pop ups and corporate caterers.

Peter Ducker FIH, chief executive, Institute of Hospitality, says: “Efficient payment systems mean a faster service, with more customers served in less time. The Institute of Hospitality prides itself on offering great partnership deals to our community of members and we are delighted to welcome Lolly, a hospitality-specific company that provides essential support to our diverse, dynamic and entrepreneurial industry.”

Peter Moore, CEO of Lolly, comments: “Through our membership of the Institute of Hospitality, we hope to align ourselves with industry colleagues, and to benefit from the knowledge-sharing and best practice, which – in turn – we will pass on to our own clients. Best practice is vital to the success and growth of the sector.”

The company offers a complete point of sale package where customers can use its EPoS software on tills and PoS tablets. Lolly then networks these to card payment machines, to speed up service and provides a cloud-based back office, supplying real-time business analytics.

Lolly provides enterprise level EPoS at an affordable price. Today, it is the only UK business of its kind that can truly scale from a downloadable product to a fully connected real-time network of tills, powered by an enterprise-level inventory reporting management system.

For more information visit the Lolly website: https://www.itslolly.com/

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Institute of Hospitality new webinar season spring-summer 2017

webinar logo

The Institute of Hospitality webinars are a series of informative and educational online presentations, available to members and non-members, and designed to help you advance in your professional career and business. Industry professionals and business experts share their knowledge and know-how during live online sessions, that you can access from the comfort of your home or office, and from any mobile device.

Our webinars include Q&A sessions and you can recieve follow-up materials. Last year we delivered over 50 webinars, helping hundreds of individuals improve their personal and professional skills, as well as their business knowledge.

Webinars are complimentary for members of the Institute of Hospitality. Non-members can access our live sessions for £10 (incl. VAT).

Book your places now for our new season of webinars and get yourself and your business ahead in 2017.

New Webinar Programme

4 April 2017 3pm UK timeNEW HA LOGO
Quality assessments vs online reviews
Trisha Bennett FIH director, Hospitality Assured

In this digital age, are business quality assessments still an important customer service benchmarking tool, when more and more customer are  trusting online reviews?

Hospitality Cruise Logo25 April 2017 3pm UK time
Recruitment and retention: first impressions matter
Neil Shorthouse, Hospitality Cruise International

With much of the recruitment process now taking place online, it is important to ensure that you make the right impression and leave applicants with a positive image of your organisation. The webinar will look at how to get the basics right (respond promptly to enquiries, time-management, treat applicants as individuals) and look at how online and off-line recruitment channels perform in relation to retention.

Snapshot logo9 May 2017 3pm UK time
Adopting new technology doesn’t need to be hard
Janel Clark, Snapshot

In 2017 it is no longer necessary to commit to one stand-alone system for everything. How can you pick and choose apps to suit your hotel and needs? In this webinar learn how using smaller software can reduce risk, give flexibility and improve productivity and cost efficiency for your hotel.

23 May 2017 3pm UK timeTrivago Logo
How hotels can compete with the holiday rental market
Aly Thompson, Trivago

Holiday rental websites are growing in number and increasing in popularity. In particular the sharing economy has gained a lot of attention in recent years, but what is it about these sites that really appeals to travellers?  Aly looks at traveller behaviour and the positioning of such websites to find out, and identify some actions hoteliers can take to market themselves competitively to the same traveller group. We’ll also look at the numbers and give an up-to-date assessment of the growth, and therefore opportunity, of the holiday rental market.

13 June 2017 3pm UK timeUpskill People Logo
Truly changing behaviour with e-learning
Peter Fullard, Upskill People

Skills development must go beyond ‘ticking the box’ to deliver a real business bottom-line benefit. Peter will focus on showing how hospitality professionals can ensure that e-learning supports a change in team behaviour that lasts. It will cover how to successfully develop, deploy and measure online training.

11 July 2017 3pm UK timeTrivago Logo
How to drive direct bookings to your hotel
Aly Thompson, Trivago

Driving direct bookings is not all about big marketing budgets. It’s about taking control of the tools at your disposal to enable the traveller to find your hotel in the early stages of their research, and hooking them so they book with you directly. Aly looks at the basics of content marketing, website user experience, and search engine optimisation. She will also look at websites travellers commonly visit in the inspiration phase of their travel research, to identify partnership opportunities beyond distribution channels.

25 July 2017 3pm UK timeGeorgian House logo
Taking control of your career progression
Adam Rowledge, Georgian House Hotel

Your manager or HR office may not have the necessary time to devote to your development.  Instead, we have to take control of making the right career choices and fulfilling our career potential.

Book your webinars now

Note: If the scheduled time (3pm UK time on Tuesdays) is not convenient, members can still access the webinars at a later date from our website.

 

 

New research into wine ordering

eurochrie-research-winnerThe winners of the Institute of Hospitality Education Research Award 2016 at last year’s EuroCHRIE conference in Budapest were Henri Kuokkanen MIH  (pictured right) and Carlos da Silva MIH for their research into the future of wine ordering in restaurants

Wine can be a source of great pleasure. Yet consumers may perceive selecting wine a risk, and particularly in restaurants the choice can create stress. The solid reputation of a restaurant eases such concerns when patrons can seek advice from expert staff. When combined perfectly with food, wine elevates a meal experience to a new level. Thus wine selection is an essential component of customer experience, and the assistance a restaurant offers is critical.

A wine steward, or sommelier, acts as a facilitator in wine purchases by providing sensory descriptions of wines. While a sommelier directly boosts wine sales, he or she also indirectly augments wine revenue through better staff training. Customers generally perceive extended interaction with staff positively, generating further benefits from hiring a sommelier.

Employing trained sommeliers inevitably increases costs. In an attempt to enhance customer experience without this cost, some restaurants have replaced traditional paper wine lists with electronic tablets.

Tablets as food menus show promise in enhancing the service experience of a customer by providing extended information, but the potential of combining food and wine orders on tablets has yet to be tested. Tablets are beneficial when customers perceive value in them, and wine suggestions may be included in these tools. Restaurant revenue management may also benefit from the use of technology. However, the special role of wine in creating a dining experience calls for extra attention to how wine itself is presented; it should not merely be treated as a sub-component of the food menu.

To read more (the article The Wine Tablet Experience in the current issue of HQ Magazine, the Institute of Hospitality official publication), click here
For the full research paper, please contact Henri Kuokkanen MIH, research and education, Switzerland, email: henri.kuokkanen@gmail.com

“A word about social media”

In an extract from her new book Star Quality Experience The Hotelier’s Guide to Creating Memorable Guest Journeys, Monica Or FIH provides concise, easy-to-follow advice on social media

sqe-book-cover-3d-web-res“Whether or not you use social media should be a business choice rather than a personal choice. The main reason for social media is to grow an online community that you can engage with. It can be time consuming, so unless you are willing to post regularly and update your community on what you are doing, then it may be best to stay clear. It also depends on your customer base. If they are avid users of social media then you should have a presence. When used correctly, social media can be a great way to gain referrals through word of mouth and to spread your message far and wide.

According to a survey conducted by Visit Britain (2015)
Facebook was the main go-to source for respondents in all stages of the holiday making process, especially those who visited Britain
Twitter was most used for seeking suggestions and advice
Instagram was used by people who wanted to plan their trip or share experiences.

So let’s look at how to utilise these popular platforms…..”
Click here to read on…

Is your hospitality website mobile friendly? Here’s a quick way to find out

Easy to understand and use, you'll appreciate this new guide about how to improve your presence on mobile devices!
Easy to understand and use, you’ll appreciate this new guide about how to improve your presence on mobile devices!

Love it or hate it, businesses can’t ignore the importance of Google and its rankings, particularly when it comes to how a hospitality business is located by consumers conducting online searches. Recent research by technology experts Avvio across a group of hotel websites confirms that mobile bookings are growing at a fast pace and made up more than 52% of overall online bookings for the surveyed sites in 2014. These hotel’s websites are making certain they appeal to all potential customers – including those on mobile devices.

The Institute’s newest management guide helps hospitality managers and owners determine whether their business’s website is as mobile friendly as it should be. In easy-to-understand language  – you don’t need to be an IT expert! – the new guide explains why and how hotel websites can appeal to consumers on mobile devices. The guide also provides links to FREE reliable websites that can quickly analyse your business’s mobile ‘friendliness’ using your business’s url. The sites explain measures that can be taken to improve the website’s mobile friendliness. The process is fast and there’s no commitment or registration required from the free sites – this couldn’t be easier! In 15 minutes, you can read the guide and discover how your business’s website really appears to mobile users.

Find this hugely practical new guide, Does Your Website Meet New Mobile Standards? (2015), written by the experts at Avvio, on the Institute’s website under Management Guides.

“The Mobile Revolution Is Here: Are You Ready?” A report from Cornell School of Hotel Administration

What are customers seeking when using technology for hospitality purchases?
What are customers seeking when using technology for hospitality purchases?

Wondering what your customers want when it comes to technology and convenience? Here’s a report from the hospitality researchers at the Cornell School of Hotel Administration explaining the results of a survey of 745 US travellers and their tech ‘wish list’. It confirms when technology is being used, the favoured devices (tablets, smart phones or PCs) and where technology may be disappointing consumers.

This report can provide forward-thinking hospitality businesses with ideas about how to appeal to tech-savvy customers, whether it is in the research, booking or travel stage of the selection and purchase process.

Find the report here at: The Mobile Revolution Is Here: Are You Ready? – Cornell School of Hotel Administration.

SMEs can embrace mobile payment technology says Peter Ducker FIH

EAT restaurants have been using contactless technology since 2008

New mobile and contactless payment technology is particularly suitable for small and entrepreneurial businesses, says Peter Ducker, chief executive of the Institute of Hospitality

If you are an Oyster cardholder you will have recently received an email from Transport for London encouraging you to use your contactless-enabled debit card instead of your Oyster card from now on.  This is a sure sign that contactless payment is finally going mainstream.  We will be using the same card to travel and buy everyday items and our lunch. The need to use a separate Oyster card and top it up inside stations will ultimately become obsolete.

Contactless payment and the technology behind it –  Near-field Communication – have been around for a number of years. In the UK, EAT was one of the first high street chains to introduce nationwide contactless payment in 2008.

The weakness of the system, which persists today, has been the lack of security. If you mislay your Oyster card or contactless debit card, anyone can pick it up and use it during the time that elapses before you realise it is missing and cancel it.  This is the reason there is a £20 transaction limit and the banks absorb all of the risk on behalf of the both the user and the business.

But now payment with a mobile phone is the safer, next generation of contact-less payment because transactions need to be authorised with a thumbprint or by entering a pin number and consequently are secure and have no limit.

Mobile payment also points to a time when the physical cards themselves – and the security risks they inherently carry – will be unnecessary; debit and credit card information is simply securely stored in the phone; if the phone is lost or stolen it is much easier to replace virtual information than mail out new cards.

So you might think you are already heavily reliant on your phone, yet in the very near future your mobile could become your sole method of paying for goods and services.

Hospitality does not have a very good record when it comes to investing in new technology.  In fact, nearly one fifth of hospitality businesses do not even accept card payment.  According to a survey of Institute of Hospitality members and their operations by Chip & PIN Solutions, 19% said they were cash-only businesses.

Although everyone has the right to run their business as they see fit, not to accept widespread methods of payment does not make commercial sense; you are simply limiting the ability of your guests to spend money since impulse purchases do not exist.  Yes, there is some commission to pay when accepting cards, but this should be more than compensated for by increased turnover.

As mobile and contactless payment become more prevalent, there is a danger that some businesses will get left behind.  That would be a mistake.   New payment technology is particularly suitable for small and entrepreneurial businesses because it eliminates the need for expensive card terminals or point-of-sale systems.

If you run a market stall, a mobile food van, a small restaurant or a B&B you can simply buy a device from the website of well-known global payment companies and have it posted to you. The device plugs into your phone or tablet and allows you to take card payments.