Aspiring Managers Awards Shortlist Announced by Institute of Hospitality

four-seasons-domeA shortlist of rising stars in the world of hospitality management has been announced ahead of the Institute of Hospitality Aspiring Managers Awards.

The awards, now in their tenth year, take place at the magnificent new London venue Four Seasons at Ten Trinity (pictured) on Friday 10 November.tentrinity_full_640x740

The event is organised by the Institute of Hospitality London Branch. The overall winner will receive an awards package focused on further professional development and networking, including invitations to five key industry events, a mentoring programme and accredited training.

This year’s shortlisted rising stars are:

Callum Curtis-Bennett, Deputy General Manager, The Brookwood Partnership
Carmen Rademacher, Director of Sales, Hilton London Bankside
Charlotte Horler,  Front of Office Manager, Montague on the Gardens (Red Carnation Hotels)
Ciaran Burns, Assistant Front Office Manager, The Dorchester London
Daniel Dreiseitel, Assistant  Restaurant Manager, The Ritz London
Daniel Thompson MIH, General Manager, Thurlestone Estates (Mullion Cove Hotel)
Laura Amos, Catering Manager, Ampersand
Rebecca Cupitt, Group Manager, Lusso Catering

The evening starts with drinks at 6.30pm followed by a sumptuous three-course dinner in the grand ballroom, live music, a magician’s performance and an inspirational guest speaker, Jason Allen Scott, an entrepreneur and expert on event management.

The Institute of Hospitality Aspiring Managers Awards
Date
: Friday 10 November 2017
Time: 6.30pm
Venue: Four Seasons Hotel Trinity Square, London
Tickets for Institute of Hospitality members: £150 per person
Tickets for non-members and guests: £175 per person
Table cost for members: £1400 for a table of 10

Bookings: Contact Paul Evans FIH at paulevans@consultinc.co.uk
Or Antionio Fernandes FIH at asfernan@blueyonder.co.uk
Bookings deadline is 1 November 2017.  Act now to avoid disappointment.

Last year's winners
Last year’s finalists, including overall winner Gaia Martini, now joint managing director of the Danilo Cortellini Hospitality School (centre).

 

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Institute to share high-quality research with industry

9 Maria Gebbels MIH
Lecturers, including Maria Gebbels MIH at the University of Greenwich, are encouraging their students to submit research to the Insitute of Hospitality Digest


Calling all hospitality management students. Have your coursework published in the Institute of Hospitality Digest and share it with industry leaders ( first edition deadline is 16 October).

The Institute of Hospitality Digest will be a new online collection of the very best research by student members studying at our international community of universities and colleges. We are now accepting submissions for the first edition.

The aim of the Institute of Hospitality Digest is to collect the very best academic research and share it with the Institute’s wider community of operators and managers.

The Institute’s chief executive Peter Ducker FIH says: “We hope that the Institute of Hospitality Digest plays a role in bringing academia and industry closer together and encourages colleges to undertake research that has a practical application for today’s and tomorrow’s managers.”

The Digest has been welcomed by lecturers. Dr Maria Gebbels MIH, Lecturer in Hospitality Management at the University of Greenwich, says: “This is a brilliant idea and I hope that our students will be excited to share their dissertation research on this e-platform.”

Cora Huen, Head of Program, Division of Tourism and Hospitality, Hong Kong College of Technology, says: “This idea is indeed an effective platform for institutions to showcase the employability credentials of their students.”

Professor Brian King, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, says: “Our students will be greatly encouraged to know that such an outlet is available to disseminate their work.”

The Institute has 75 universities and colleges on its Education Membership Scheme, adding up to more than 3,000 student members across the world.

The Institute of Hospitality Digest welcomes your submissions.
Submit your research now.
Download the submission guidelines

 

Institute of Hospitality’s new autumn webinars

webinar logoInstitute of Hospitality webinars are a series of informative and educational online presentations, available to members and non-members, and designed to help you advance in your professional careers and businesses.

Industry professionals and experts share their knowledge and know-how during live online sessions, that you can access from the comfort of your home, office, or from any mobile device.

Our webinars include Q&A sessions and follow-up materials. If you are unable to attend, you can log into your membership area to retrieve any past webinar recordings anytime*.

We have delivered over 50 webinars, helping hundreds of individuals improve their personal and professional skills, as well as their business knowledge.

Webinars are complimentary for members of the Institute of Hospitality. Non-members can access our live sessions for £10 (incl. VAT).

Book your webinars now

12 September 2017 3pm UK Time
First Impressions – WOW!
Sarah Brickwood MIH and Jo Woods of Smart Revenue look at the impact of the service provided to those making email or telephone enquries on eventual bookings.

26 September 2017 3pm UK Time
Food Waste Recycling
ReFood, experts in food waste recycling, look at the facts, figures and the ways to save money and food, as they celebrate the opening of their £32m anaerobic digestion facility in Dagenham.

10 October 2017 3pm UK Time
Brexit’s impact on hospitality
John Coldicutt, chief marketing officer, Planday, and the Institute’s chief executive Peter Ducker FIH present the unique findings from our survey of your experiences of Brexit.

31 October 2017 3pm UK Time
How to become a black-belt negotiator
Tom Flatau of Teamworking International advises on how to get that all-important emotional buy-in, shift the balance of power in your favour, and stop getting beaten down on price and making unnecessary concessions.

14 November 2017 3pm UK Time
How to blend e-Learning with other formats
Pete Fullard of Upskill People provides a case study of the University Caterers Organisation’s strategy to work with the specific needs of its membership to implement e-learning as part of a blend of wider methods of delivering, tracking and analysing knowledge and skills.

28 November 2017 3pm UK Time
Loyalty and love
Reka Mizsei, lectuerer, Glion Institute
Are hotel guests loyal because of the incentive they get from loyalty programmes or are they loyal because they love the brand? Do hotels need a loyalty programme to gain brand love?

12 December 2017 3pm UK Time
Immigration and discrimination – planning for 2018 and beyond
Jonathan Gray, partner employment and licensing law, Pitmans LLP
To review the latest thinking on Brexit and immigration issues as at the end of 2017, and to consider how to fill the potential staff/skill gaps of the future by being a successful equal opportunities employer. This will include how to properly manage the gender pay gap reporting obligations and what to be aware of from an age discrimination perspective when seeking to attract and retain younger and older workers.

Book your webinars now

Note: If the scheduled time (3pm UK time on Tuesdays) is not convenient, you can still access the webinars at a later date from our website.

 

Institute of Hospitality acquires Academy of Food & Wine Service and Hospitality & Leisure Manpower

The Institute of Hospitality has made two important acquisitions: The Academy of Food & Wine Service and Hospitality & Leisure Manpower.

 The Institute’s chief executive Peter Ducker FIH explains how these businesses will fit into the Institute’s strategic plans regarding customer service and productivity.

“For 30 years the Academy of Food & Wine Service has provided training programmes, offering a pathway to management for those working in front-of-house service. It has run some important industry competitions and provided support to its members as the professional body for front-of-house food & beverage service.”

“Given our increased focus on training and the development of our own online training using the Upskill People platform, this acquisition gives us a tremendous wealth of training material which will be of tremendous value to the industry, both in the UK and overseas.”

Hospitality and Leisure Manpower (HALM) is a national training, research and consulting group, founded and managed by David Battersby OBE FIH, a former president of the Institute of Hospitality and co-founder of the Gold Service Scholarship. HALM has developed algorithms to benchmark productivity in hospitality.

In 2001, with the British Hospitality Association, Battersby launched the ‘Profit Through Productivity’ programme with backing from the Government and key trade associations. ‘Profit Through Productivity’ provided regional workshops across the UK to help businesses increase their profits and efficiency.

Ducker adds: “Given the pressures of wage inflation and the concerns associated with recruiting and retaining talent, this acquisition will enable us to help members identify opportunities within their businesses, and will also give us a service of value to the industry at large, worldwide.”

Institute chairman Stephen Kyjak-Lane FIH MI comments:

“In 2018 the Institute celebrates its 80th anniversary. These strategic acquisitions, combined with advances the Institute is making on a number of fronts demonstrate clearly that we are as important and relevant to the industry today as ever. Over the coming months you will see these two organisations re-emerge, delivering valuable support to our great industry.”

 The two organisations were previously owned by the British Institute of Innkeeping.

Combustible Cladding – Advice from Pitmans Law

Grenfell_Tower_fire_morningIn the wake of the Grenfell Tower tragedy it is not just the landlords of high rise council tower blocks and those in the public sector who should be concerned about the presence of combustible cladding in their buildings, writes Alan Davies, partner, Pitmans Law

Landlords of hotels and indeed of all premises in the hospitality and leisure industry have a duty to ensure that their premises are safe for all persons who use them and should be proactive in the ongoing compliance with their obligations. They should check the fire safety accreditation and building regulation compliance of any panelling used in their buildings and contact their surveyors or architects for advice.

If their premises contain cladding panels which are found to contain Aluminium Composite Material (ACM) or similar materials, they may not be compliant with the requirements of current Building Regulations guidance. Samples of any such materials can be provided for verification to independent testing facilities such as The Building Research Establishment (BRE).

If the materials are non-compliant, measures would include informing the local fire and rescue service requesting they carry out an urgent inspection and checking of the most recent fire risk assessment for the buildings concerned and considering action to have the panels removed.

In addition, as a matter of good practice, full fire safety checks should be implemented including ensuring that all entrance doors, and doors that open onto escape corridors and stairways, are fire resisting and effective in self-closing. Also check all walls, plant and store rooms to ensure there are no obvious routes for fire or smoke to spread such as holes where pipes and cables pass through walls.

Smoke control systems, including associated fire detection and suppression systems (including sufficient and appropriate fire extinguishers) should be tested to make sure they are operating correctly and if there is no sprinkler system, landlords are recommended to take advice on installation.

Contact:
Alan Davis

Partner, for and on behalf of Pitmans LLP
D +44 (0)118 957 0300
M +44 (0)788 182 5803
Email: alandavies@pitmans.com
www.pitmans.com

Pitmans Law is a Businesss Partner of the Institute of Hospitality

Institute of Hospitality new webinar season spring-summer 2017

webinar logo

The Institute of Hospitality webinars are a series of informative and educational online presentations, available to members and non-members, and designed to help you advance in your professional career and business. Industry professionals and business experts share their knowledge and know-how during live online sessions, that you can access from the comfort of your home or office, and from any mobile device.

Our webinars include Q&A sessions and you can recieve follow-up materials. Last year we delivered over 50 webinars, helping hundreds of individuals improve their personal and professional skills, as well as their business knowledge.

Webinars are complimentary for members of the Institute of Hospitality. Non-members can access our live sessions for £10 (incl. VAT).

Book your places now for our new season of webinars and get yourself and your business ahead in 2017.

New Webinar Programme

4 April 2017 3pm UK timeNEW HA LOGO
Quality assessments vs online reviews
Trisha Bennett FIH director, Hospitality Assured

In this digital age, are business quality assessments still an important customer service benchmarking tool, when more and more customer are  trusting online reviews?

Hospitality Cruise Logo25 April 2017 3pm UK time
Recruitment and retention: first impressions matter
Neil Shorthouse, Hospitality Cruise International

With much of the recruitment process now taking place online, it is important to ensure that you make the right impression and leave applicants with a positive image of your organisation. The webinar will look at how to get the basics right (respond promptly to enquiries, time-management, treat applicants as individuals) and look at how online and off-line recruitment channels perform in relation to retention.

Snapshot logo9 May 2017 3pm UK time
Adopting new technology doesn’t need to be hard
Janel Clark, Snapshot

In 2017 it is no longer necessary to commit to one stand-alone system for everything. How can you pick and choose apps to suit your hotel and needs? In this webinar learn how using smaller software can reduce risk, give flexibility and improve productivity and cost efficiency for your hotel.

23 May 2017 3pm UK timeTrivago Logo
How hotels can compete with the holiday rental market
Aly Thompson, Trivago

Holiday rental websites are growing in number and increasing in popularity. In particular the sharing economy has gained a lot of attention in recent years, but what is it about these sites that really appeals to travellers?  Aly looks at traveller behaviour and the positioning of such websites to find out, and identify some actions hoteliers can take to market themselves competitively to the same traveller group. We’ll also look at the numbers and give an up-to-date assessment of the growth, and therefore opportunity, of the holiday rental market.

13 June 2017 3pm UK timeUpskill People Logo
Truly changing behaviour with e-learning
Peter Fullard, Upskill People

Skills development must go beyond ‘ticking the box’ to deliver a real business bottom-line benefit. Peter will focus on showing how hospitality professionals can ensure that e-learning supports a change in team behaviour that lasts. It will cover how to successfully develop, deploy and measure online training.

11 July 2017 3pm UK timeTrivago Logo
How to drive direct bookings to your hotel
Aly Thompson, Trivago

Driving direct bookings is not all about big marketing budgets. It’s about taking control of the tools at your disposal to enable the traveller to find your hotel in the early stages of their research, and hooking them so they book with you directly. Aly looks at the basics of content marketing, website user experience, and search engine optimisation. She will also look at websites travellers commonly visit in the inspiration phase of their travel research, to identify partnership opportunities beyond distribution channels.

25 July 2017 3pm UK timeGeorgian House logo
Taking control of your career progression
Adam Rowledge, Georgian House Hotel

Your manager or HR office may not have the necessary time to devote to your development.  Instead, we have to take control of making the right career choices and fulfilling our career potential.

Book your webinars now

Note: If the scheduled time (3pm UK time on Tuesdays) is not convenient, members can still access the webinars at a later date from our website.

 

 

The Hospitality Pandemic – Are You Infected?

giles-g-s-for-iohThis blog comes from one of our newest members, Giles Gordon-Smith AIH, a former hotel inspector and manager at The Goring who now runs his own customer service consultancy Penshee. Giles is blogging on The Huffington Post, where the following first appeared.

Everything seemed to be going so well, and then it happened again. “ENJOY”. Nothing with it, other than perhaps an exclamation mark – “ENJOY!”. You’ve heard it too, right? You must have done, it’s everywhere; from London to LA and back again the long way around, that word echoes through our industry.

I know by now to try to block it out but occasionally one slips through the net like a cardamom pod in a biryani – Whack! ENJOY! Don’t let the Michelin star and the immaculately groomed waiter fool you either, a Swiss sommelier once hit me with one after decanting a rather fine bottle of claret and telling us a wonderful story about the owner of the house (who used to sit on table three). I nosed and tasted the perfectly poured measure and then he got me. “ENJOY!”

This was another good one – I was in a hotel in Istanbul and I’d asked for some shampoo to be sent to the room. The delivery interaction went something like this:

Friendly attendant: Good evening Mr. Gordon-Smith, I have the shampoo that you requested.
Me: Thank you, that’s kind.
Friendly attendant: Enjoy!

What? How? Okay, it was good shampoo and it left a pleasant scent of lime groves, but really. I even used to count them – fourteen ‘enjoys’ in a meal was the record (I won’t name and shame the hotel). Can a verbal tick be contagious, or worse still, pandemic? I get that it’s an easy thing to say and, your supervisor does it and it’s better than silence, but please, think about stopping.

It’s indicative of something bigger

Okay, I’m being playful, but actually I think that this innocuous and essentially well-meaning five letter word is reflective of something larger. Oh, and here’s my confession; I used to use it too. I wasn’t really even aware, but I did. It was only when it was pointed out to me by none other than my mother, that I started to realise the abandon with which I used the word.

Habitual behaviour can be a positive in hospitality; you need it to be prepared on a daily basis and to deliver service according to the expected rigorous standards. However, becoming too rehearsed by nature can have a negative effect. Repeatedly using terms such as ‘enjoy’ is reflective of a roboticism in the industry that is getting in the way of natural service. Variations include the over-use of affirmations such as ‘you’re welcome’ and ‘that’s fine’ (I should hope that it’s fine to ask for a menu) and superlatives such as ‘wonderful’ and ‘absolutely’ – especially bothersome when taken out of context and not relating to what you have just said as a guest. It also demonstrates lack of thought and a certain ‘presenteeism’ – being there, but going through the motions.

Am I Infected?

Given that I was unaware that I was using the term so much, perhaps you are too? Maybe you have your own verbal tick? The fact that you are now asking the question is a good start; after all, self-awareness is hugely important when trying to improve the way that we interact with guests, friends and colleagues.

If the answer is yes, what do we do about it?

The problem is that me telling you what to say as an alternative is paradoxical and so I’m not going to do that. What I would urge instead is to think. Look to be present in the moment when you are serving guests and where possible, make your comment relevant to what’s gone before in your interactions. By way of a compromise and to wean yourself off the shortened version, you could even revert to the fuller version “I hope you enjoy your scallops madam”, but don’t say it if you don’t mean it. As always, look to make eye contact and listen to the guest, and if they thank you for the dish, there’s your opportunity to respond in kind. This might sound like extraordinarily elementary advice, but take it from somebody who has been lucky enough to have had thousands of fine dining experiences around the world – it’s advice that’s needed. Your guests want to feel understood and appreciated, and you simply cannot do that by adopting a ‘one phrase fits all’ service mentality. Enj… Good luck.

Follow Giles Gordon-Smith on Twitter: www.twitter.com/gilesatpenshee