Institute of Hospitality acquires Academy of Food & Wine Service and Hospitality & Leisure Manpower

The Institute of Hospitality has made two important acquisitions: The Academy of Food & Wine Service and Hospitality & Leisure Manpower.

 The Institute’s chief executive Peter Ducker FIH explains how these businesses will fit into the Institute’s strategic plans regarding customer service and productivity.

“For 30 years the Academy of Food & Wine Service has provided training programmes, offering a pathway to management for those working in front-of-house service. It has run some important industry competitions and provided support to its members as the professional body for front-of-house food & beverage service.”

“Given our increased focus on training and the development of our own online training using the Upskill People platform, this acquisition gives us a tremendous wealth of training material which will be of tremendous value to the industry, both in the UK and overseas.”

Hospitality and Leisure Manpower (HALM) is a national training, research and consulting group, founded and managed by David Battersby OBE FIH, a former president of the Institute of Hospitality and co-founder of the Gold Service Scholarship. HALM has developed algorithms to benchmark productivity in hospitality.

In 2001, with the British Hospitality Association, Battersby launched the ‘Profit Through Productivity’ programme with backing from the Government and key trade associations. ‘Profit Through Productivity’ provided regional workshops across the UK to help businesses increase their profits and efficiency.

Ducker adds: “Given the pressures of wage inflation and the concerns associated with recruiting and retaining talent, this acquisition will enable us to help members identify opportunities within their businesses, and will also give us a service of value to the industry at large, worldwide.”

Institute chairman Stephen Kyjak-Lane FIH MI comments:

“In 2018 the Institute celebrates its 80th anniversary. These strategic acquisitions, combined with advances the Institute is making on a number of fronts demonstrate clearly that we are as important and relevant to the industry today as ever. Over the coming months you will see these two organisations re-emerge, delivering valuable support to our great industry.”

 The two organisations were previously owned by the British Institute of Innkeeping.

Combustible Cladding – Advice from Pitmans Law

Grenfell_Tower_fire_morningIn the wake of the Grenfell Tower tragedy it is not just the landlords of high rise council tower blocks and those in the public sector who should be concerned about the presence of combustible cladding in their buildings, writes Alan Davies, partner, Pitmans Law

Landlords of hotels and indeed of all premises in the hospitality and leisure industry have a duty to ensure that their premises are safe for all persons who use them and should be proactive in the ongoing compliance with their obligations. They should check the fire safety accreditation and building regulation compliance of any panelling used in their buildings and contact their surveyors or architects for advice.

If their premises contain cladding panels which are found to contain Aluminium Composite Material (ACM) or similar materials, they may not be compliant with the requirements of current Building Regulations guidance. Samples of any such materials can be provided for verification to independent testing facilities such as The Building Research Establishment (BRE).

If the materials are non-compliant, measures would include informing the local fire and rescue service requesting they carry out an urgent inspection and checking of the most recent fire risk assessment for the buildings concerned and considering action to have the panels removed.

In addition, as a matter of good practice, full fire safety checks should be implemented including ensuring that all entrance doors, and doors that open onto escape corridors and stairways, are fire resisting and effective in self-closing. Also check all walls, plant and store rooms to ensure there are no obvious routes for fire or smoke to spread such as holes where pipes and cables pass through walls.

Smoke control systems, including associated fire detection and suppression systems (including sufficient and appropriate fire extinguishers) should be tested to make sure they are operating correctly and if there is no sprinkler system, landlords are recommended to take advice on installation.

Contact:
Alan Davis

Partner, for and on behalf of Pitmans LLP
D +44 (0)118 957 0300
M +44 (0)788 182 5803
Email: alandavies@pitmans.com
www.pitmans.com

Pitmans Law is a Businesss Partner of the Institute of Hospitality

Institute of Hospitality new webinar season spring-summer 2017

webinar logo

The Institute of Hospitality webinars are a series of informative and educational online presentations, available to members and non-members, and designed to help you advance in your professional career and business. Industry professionals and business experts share their knowledge and know-how during live online sessions, that you can access from the comfort of your home or office, and from any mobile device.

Our webinars include Q&A sessions and you can recieve follow-up materials. Last year we delivered over 50 webinars, helping hundreds of individuals improve their personal and professional skills, as well as their business knowledge.

Webinars are complimentary for members of the Institute of Hospitality. Non-members can access our live sessions for £10 (incl. VAT).

Book your places now for our new season of webinars and get yourself and your business ahead in 2017.

New Webinar Programme

4 April 2017 3pm UK timeNEW HA LOGO
Quality assessments vs online reviews
Trisha Bennett FIH director, Hospitality Assured

In this digital age, are business quality assessments still an important customer service benchmarking tool, when more and more customer are  trusting online reviews?

Hospitality Cruise Logo25 April 2017 3pm UK time
Recruitment and retention: first impressions matter
Neil Shorthouse, Hospitality Cruise International

With much of the recruitment process now taking place online, it is important to ensure that you make the right impression and leave applicants with a positive image of your organisation. The webinar will look at how to get the basics right (respond promptly to enquiries, time-management, treat applicants as individuals) and look at how online and off-line recruitment channels perform in relation to retention.

Snapshot logo9 May 2017 3pm UK time
Adopting new technology doesn’t need to be hard
Janel Clark, Snapshot

In 2017 it is no longer necessary to commit to one stand-alone system for everything. How can you pick and choose apps to suit your hotel and needs? In this webinar learn how using smaller software can reduce risk, give flexibility and improve productivity and cost efficiency for your hotel.

23 May 2017 3pm UK timeTrivago Logo
How hotels can compete with the holiday rental market
Aly Thompson, Trivago

Holiday rental websites are growing in number and increasing in popularity. In particular the sharing economy has gained a lot of attention in recent years, but what is it about these sites that really appeals to travellers?  Aly looks at traveller behaviour and the positioning of such websites to find out, and identify some actions hoteliers can take to market themselves competitively to the same traveller group. We’ll also look at the numbers and give an up-to-date assessment of the growth, and therefore opportunity, of the holiday rental market.

13 June 2017 3pm UK timeUpskill People Logo
Truly changing behaviour with e-learning
Peter Fullard, Upskill People

Skills development must go beyond ‘ticking the box’ to deliver a real business bottom-line benefit. Peter will focus on showing how hospitality professionals can ensure that e-learning supports a change in team behaviour that lasts. It will cover how to successfully develop, deploy and measure online training.

11 July 2017 3pm UK timeTrivago Logo
How to drive direct bookings to your hotel
Aly Thompson, Trivago

Driving direct bookings is not all about big marketing budgets. It’s about taking control of the tools at your disposal to enable the traveller to find your hotel in the early stages of their research, and hooking them so they book with you directly. Aly looks at the basics of content marketing, website user experience, and search engine optimisation. She will also look at websites travellers commonly visit in the inspiration phase of their travel research, to identify partnership opportunities beyond distribution channels.

25 July 2017 3pm UK timeGeorgian House logo
Taking control of your career progression
Adam Rowledge, Georgian House Hotel

Your manager or HR office may not have the necessary time to devote to your development.  Instead, we have to take control of making the right career choices and fulfilling our career potential.

Book your webinars now

Note: If the scheduled time (3pm UK time on Tuesdays) is not convenient, members can still access the webinars at a later date from our website.

 

 

The Hospitality Pandemic – Are You Infected?

giles-g-s-for-iohThis blog comes from one of our newest members, Giles Gordon-Smith AIH, a former hotel inspector and manager at The Goring who now runs his own customer service consultancy Penshee. Giles is blogging on The Huffington Post, where the following first appeared.

Everything seemed to be going so well, and then it happened again. “ENJOY”. Nothing with it, other than perhaps an exclamation mark – “ENJOY!”. You’ve heard it too, right? You must have done, it’s everywhere; from London to LA and back again the long way around, that word echoes through our industry.

I know by now to try to block it out but occasionally one slips through the net like a cardamom pod in a biryani – Whack! ENJOY! Don’t let the Michelin star and the immaculately groomed waiter fool you either, a Swiss sommelier once hit me with one after decanting a rather fine bottle of claret and telling us a wonderful story about the owner of the house (who used to sit on table three). I nosed and tasted the perfectly poured measure and then he got me. “ENJOY!”

This was another good one – I was in a hotel in Istanbul and I’d asked for some shampoo to be sent to the room. The delivery interaction went something like this:

Friendly attendant: Good evening Mr. Gordon-Smith, I have the shampoo that you requested.
Me: Thank you, that’s kind.
Friendly attendant: Enjoy!

What? How? Okay, it was good shampoo and it left a pleasant scent of lime groves, but really. I even used to count them – fourteen ‘enjoys’ in a meal was the record (I won’t name and shame the hotel). Can a verbal tick be contagious, or worse still, pandemic? I get that it’s an easy thing to say and, your supervisor does it and it’s better than silence, but please, think about stopping.

It’s indicative of something bigger

Okay, I’m being playful, but actually I think that this innocuous and essentially well-meaning five letter word is reflective of something larger. Oh, and here’s my confession; I used to use it too. I wasn’t really even aware, but I did. It was only when it was pointed out to me by none other than my mother, that I started to realise the abandon with which I used the word.

Habitual behaviour can be a positive in hospitality; you need it to be prepared on a daily basis and to deliver service according to the expected rigorous standards. However, becoming too rehearsed by nature can have a negative effect. Repeatedly using terms such as ‘enjoy’ is reflective of a roboticism in the industry that is getting in the way of natural service. Variations include the over-use of affirmations such as ‘you’re welcome’ and ‘that’s fine’ (I should hope that it’s fine to ask for a menu) and superlatives such as ‘wonderful’ and ‘absolutely’ – especially bothersome when taken out of context and not relating to what you have just said as a guest. It also demonstrates lack of thought and a certain ‘presenteeism’ – being there, but going through the motions.

Am I Infected?

Given that I was unaware that I was using the term so much, perhaps you are too? Maybe you have your own verbal tick? The fact that you are now asking the question is a good start; after all, self-awareness is hugely important when trying to improve the way that we interact with guests, friends and colleagues.

If the answer is yes, what do we do about it?

The problem is that me telling you what to say as an alternative is paradoxical and so I’m not going to do that. What I would urge instead is to think. Look to be present in the moment when you are serving guests and where possible, make your comment relevant to what’s gone before in your interactions. By way of a compromise and to wean yourself off the shortened version, you could even revert to the fuller version “I hope you enjoy your scallops madam”, but don’t say it if you don’t mean it. As always, look to make eye contact and listen to the guest, and if they thank you for the dish, there’s your opportunity to respond in kind. This might sound like extraordinarily elementary advice, but take it from somebody who has been lucky enough to have had thousands of fine dining experiences around the world – it’s advice that’s needed. Your guests want to feel understood and appreciated, and you simply cannot do that by adopting a ‘one phrase fits all’ service mentality. Enj… Good luck.

Follow Giles Gordon-Smith on Twitter: www.twitter.com/gilesatpenshee

 

 

 

Melvin Gold FIH shows the way to independent hotel success

Download your copy of The UK Independent Hotel Sector Today by leading consultant Melvin Gold FIH and discover a wealth of statistical information plus the key topics, actions and opportunities that will underpin the independent hotel sector’s future success.melvin-gold

“In terms of its innovation and influence the UK Independent Hotel sector has rarely beenstronger and had such influence.  Although it is shrinking, both in terms of its overall size and as a proportion of the country’s serviced accommodation sector, those that have survived – and Independent hotel rooms still comprise more than half of the serviced accommodation rooms in the UK – have thrived because they have truly understood the requirements of the 21st Century traveller and striven to satisfy their requirements.

Over 40,000 hotel rooms in independent hotels have closed in a little over a decade. In most cases failure to invest and innovate put them at risk in the face of a more discerning, better informed, consumer, and the marketing strength of hotel brands and online travel agencies (OTAs).

There are numerous examples of best practice and innovation that emanate in Independent hotels permeating through into the chains. Perhaps there is no better example than around the country’s seaside resorts, they have participated in the re-ignition of tourism. Where once it was thought that the British seaside was in terminal decline it is now evident that there is a strong market for the new breed of modern boutique and lifestyle hotels. They may not serve the traditional bucket and spade tourist but they are not as seasonal either. Their guests are aspirational and seek authenticity; quality food and drink; spas, gyms and leisure; and quality cultural and leisure attractions. Sunshine, when it comes, is an added benefit! The trend is replicated by Independent hotels in cities, thriving market towns and country houses. The common thread is that they have striven to move with the times and satisfy their customers.

There is little doubt that the hotel brands will continue their growth and equally that some Independent hotels might fall by the wayside. Some may choose to rebrand but the majority will remain, either through choice or because they are simply too small, tooquirky or too unusually located (or perhaps a combination) to affiliate. The best will provide leadership and innovation for the whole hotel sector and this report highlights key topics, actions and opportunities that are likely to underpin their success.”

The complete report is available free of charge at Independent Hotel Show weblink

Institute Announces New Webinar Season

The Institute of Hospitality launches its new season of webinars with an American perspective on ‘Brexit’s silver lining’. 

For American visitors to the UK, prices are now 30% lower than two years ago thanks to the sharp drop in sterling triggered by the EU referendum result.  In the coming months, there are strong signs that the UK is set to enjoy record-beating levels of inbound tourism. How can operators capitalise on this boom?

Peter Ducker, chief executive, Institute of Hospitality, says: “American tourists have always been our biggest spenders. Now that they will be arriving in greater numbers, there is no better time to fine-tune our customer service skills in order to wow guests and keep them coming back.  We are delighted to kick-start our webinar season with Simon Hudson, a distinguished hospitality expert from the University of South Carolina, who will deliver his unique insights into what American tourists are looking for.”

Institute of Hospitality webinars give busy hospitality professionals a full briefing on a current operational topic in 30-40 minutes. You can also ask questions and receive follow-up materials. Full programme below.

Institute of Hospitality Webinars Autumn 2016

6 September
Capitalising on Brexit’s Silver Lining
The whys and hows of training employees to wow American tourists in order to secure long-term lucrative loyalty
Dr Simon Hudson, College of Hospitality, Retail and Sport Management, University of South Carolina

20 September
We have data but how can we use it?
On average a hotel receives data from more than 12 systems everyday. Get some great tips on how to use this data while still remaining a hotelier and focusing on taking care of guests
Janel Clark, head of consultancy and education, Snapshot

4 October
Make the OTAs work for you
Learn how to embrace the role of OTAS, reduce the commission you pay, adopt an OTA strategy where you are in control and invest wisely in your hotel website
Andrew Plant, digital marketing manager, Journey

18 October
Food Allergens and Customer Excellence
The Food Allergen HACCP and due diligence framework not only helps protect your business but also appeals to a critically wary customer base, who above all want transparency and deserve service excellence like any other customer.
Julian Edwards MIH, director, Allergen Accreditation

1 November
Addressing the risk of human trafficking
The nature and necessities of human trafficking place hotel businesses in a high level of exposure. Identify the vulnerabilities in your business and discover what you can do to prevent, mitigate or eliminate the risk of human trafficking in your business.
Professor Angela Roper FIH, University of West London, and Dr Maureen Brookes, Oxford Brookes University

15 November
The effect of Brexit on employment and immigration rights
What’s the position now and what might change? What are the lessons from the Byron Hamburgers furore this summer? Find out how businesses can get ahead of potential changes.
Jonathan Gray, hospitality, tourism and leisure partner, Pitmans LLP

Careers in the exclusive world of Members Clubs

If you’ve ever walked through Westminster or the Pall Mall area in London you might have noticed the imposing facade of a private members’ club. If you have had the opportunity to enter a club, you will understand what makes them such a special place to work. The architecture, history and even the members of the clubs make them an intriguing place for anyone interested in a hospitality career.

Members Clubs often have a more intimate atmosphere, similar to a boutique hotel, where staff have an opportunity to get to know the club’s members. If a smaller organisation with the feel of a ‘family’ appeals to you, then employment at a private club could be an excellent fit.

To discover more about what it’s like to work in the world of private members’ clubs, refer to Springboard UK’s information or see their publication Hotels and Members Clubs.