Institute of Hospitality Awards 2018 Winners

280 hospitality professionals came together this week (19 June) to celebrate the very best in people development at the Institute of Hospitality Annual Dinner & Awards.

web BaxterStorey -talent development team of the yearTalent Development Team of the Year – BaxterStorey
Sponsored by Tchibo

BaxterStorey’s nine-month graduate programme fast tracks candidates into managerial roles. Now in its seventh year, it receives over 500 applications from hospitality graduates per year, proving how popular and recognised the programme is.

In 2017, BaxterStorey launched its newest training initiative: the Service Academy. Designed to ensure hospitality staff across the business are equipped with skills and confidence to provide a service to rival that of a five-star hotel, the initiative is the first of its kind within the hospitality industry. It was developed by graduate Gabrielle Le Roux AIH who successfully completed the WSET Wine Educator programme and led the application for BaxterStorey to become the first UK Contract Caterer accredited to deliver WSET courses. This also makes her the first APP educator within the foodservice industry, and she is responsible for running the training available to all 8,500 BaxterStorey staff.

web PPHE Group winnerBest Student Placement of the Year –  PPHE Hotel Group
Sponsored by Pitmans Law

PPHE Hotel Group’s you:niversityplus undergraduate placement programme has been crafted into a learning curriculum specifically designed to support the students’ development and journey in accordance with the Springboard INSPIRE kite mark. PPHE has engaged with several UK and Netherlands based universities, including Surrey, Bournemouth, Brighton, Leeds, Manchester, Portsmouth, Plymouth, Birmingham, Chester, Sunderland, and Stenden Hotel School.

Sixteen successful students (out of 140 applications) went through the selection process.
Regional training manager Paresh Vara said: “Inducting our students in the right way was important to us. We wanted them to feel welcome and know that they had made the right choice by joining our company. We designed a ‘Fresher’s Week’ full of great induction activities, starting on their first day with our company induction workshop: Connect!

“A Whatsapp group was created prior to the arrival of the students. We also provided them with an induction workbook, the Discovery Book to track their learning and serve as a reference tool throughout the placement. Their Fresher’s Week also consisted of a hotel welcome, a “get to know London”, using Twitter and Instagram to snap #landmarkselfies. Their week ended with a treasure hunt across the London hotels.”

web Hilton - best grad schemeBest Graduate Scheme of the Year – Hilton UK & Ireland
Sponsored by Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne

 Hilton UK & Ireland’s Management Development Programme was introduced in 2012 with the objective of developing the future talent pool for operational roles (assistant/departmental manager). The overall aim is to cultivate and prepare individuals who have the potential and drive to reach at least departmental manager status within 18 months. Their experience includes two nine-month hotel placements in the UK covering two main areas in each placement (F&B and front office), five residential workshops and two business-driven projects.

The graduates are assigned a hotel senior leader as mentor and also have a ‘graduate group leader’ who oversees four or five of them as a peer-group to provide additional support, guidance and direction. Since the programme’s inception in 2012, it has successfully filled 58 leadership positions.

web outstanding award Enam AliOutstanding Contribution to the Industry – Enam Ali MBE FIH
Sponsored by JING

Enam Ali MBE FIH is among the most prominent British Asian personalities and the man behind revolutionary change in the curry industry. He began his community work by establishing numerous trade associations in the 1990s and published the industry’s first and leading trade publication, Spice Business Magazine, in 1997. Subsequently he founded the Annual British Curry Awards in 2005 which is dubbed as the ‘Curry Oscars’. He is also the founder of multi award-winning restaurant Le Raj and recently established a training restaurant Le Raj Academy @ NESCOT college. Alongside this, Ali has developed outstanding relationships in the political arena as a member of the Home Office Hospitality Advisory Panel. In 2009 Enam was appointed a Member of the Order of the British Empire (MBE) in the 2009 New Year Honours for his services to the Indian and Bangladeshi restaurant industry.

web judges special award The Grand FolkestoneJudges Special Achievement AwardRobert Richardson FIH and The Grand, Folkestone
Sponsored by Planday

Peter Ducker FIH, chief executive, Institute of Hospitality, commented: “Robert has demonstrated a tireless energy and determination to support colleagues, using creative and inspiring methods to attract and retain an engaged and enthusiastic team despite not having the funds and support of a big brand behind him.”

The following organisations were Highly Commended by the judges.

web concord highly commended

Best Graduate Scheme Highly Commended – Concord Hotels

web the ritz highly commended

Best Student Placement Highly Commended – The Ritz 

web good hotel group highly commended

Talent Development Team Highly Commended – Good Hotel London

The Institute of Hospitality Annual Dinner & Awards 2018 were generously supported by the overall sponsor workforce collaboration software company Planday. The other event sponsors were Meiko and aslotel. The venue sponsor was Park Plaza Westminster Bridge.

The judges were Angela Maher, Head of Hospitality School at Oxford Brookes Business School; Wendy Sutherland, Managing Director, Ramsay Todd; Alex Wilson MIH, House Manager at Rocco Forte Hotels.

If you would like to register your interest in entering the 2019 awards or attending the event please email your contact details to events@instituteofhospitality.org and we will keep you updated.

Thanks to all those who attended and shared the event via social media. Follow the conversation #IOHAwards on Twitter – @IoH_online

 

 

 

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Green Earth Appeal and Lightspeed ePOS host Carbon Free Dining event

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Lightspeed ePOS and Green Earth Appeal have partnered to host the first event for Carbon Free Dining, a ground-breaking initiative aimed at introducing a more sustainable model for UK restaurants.

Under the programme, Carbon Free Dining plants a tree on behalf of a restaurant for every bill they present. Lightspeed ePOS then provides their platform to any restaurant under the initiative, subject to the number of trees a restaurant plants.

The initiative is already revolutionising the way local businesses and their customers give back to the environment in the fight against deforestation, extinction and global warming, having planted over 500,000 trees in more than 17 countries.

It has received support from three-Michelin star celebrity chef Marco Pierre White, James Martin and Gregory Marchand, who have since signed up their respective restaurants to Carbon Free Dining.

As part of the launch, Lightspeed and Green Earth Appeal are inviting the hospitality industry to Haz restaurant, East London, on 19th June, for an event focusing on how to create a sustainable restaurant model that will increase profitability by responding to the needs of today’s consumer. Members of the panel include Peter Hemingway, influencer and community manager at the Sustainable Restaurant Association (SRA), and Sandy Jarvis, sustainability advocate and Head chef of the renowned Culpeper restaurant in Shoreditch.

Lightspeed ePOS and Green Earth Appeal provide a cost-effective way for restaurants to showcase their corporate social responsibility at zero cost to the business.

Satinder Bindra, former director of communications for United Nations Environment, has been a strong advocate of the collaboration, stating, “[This is] an outstanding initiative which successfully merges the luxury of eating out with the joy of knowing we are simultaneously giving something back to nourish our planet”.

 Similarly, CEO and Founder of Lightspeed Dax Dasilva has also commented that, “Lightspeed was founded on pushing boundaries, empowering business and putting culture before code. By defining a new paradigm, we are redefining the industry. Carbon Free Dining is just one more step towards offering our ePOS partners and their customers a seamless way to achieve their own goals”.

 Register here for your free ticket here.

About Carbon Free Dining
Carbon Free Dining is a ground-breaking environmental certification programme managed by The United Nations Environment partner, Green Earth Appeal in partnership with Lightspeed. Simple to implement, Carbon Free Dining offers certification to those restaurants who demonstrate their passion for the environment. Carbon Free Dining-certified partners empower their diners to plant a tree in the developing world to counterbalance the environmental impact of their meal.
Learn more

About Lightspeed ePOS
Lightspeed ePOS is a cloud-based solution for independent restaurants and a Business Partner of the Institute of Hospitality.
Learn more

 

HQ explores the talent pipeline

001_HQ_SPRING_2018_SPINE.pdfYour latest issue of HQ (second quarter 2018 issue 48) is landing on UK doormats this week. It explores the talent pipeline from a number of perspectives.

Where is our next generation of leaders and senior managers coming from? It is a question often asked  in hospitality management and education circles. Your latest issue of HQ Magazine is packed with answers and opinions on the matter.

Our chief executive Peter Ducker FIH is impressed with the talented and enthusiastic young hospitality management students coming out of universities and colleges. It is up to all of us to ensure they find ways to achieve their full potential within our sector and that we do not lose them to other industries, he says.

Still just 32-years-old, Adam Rowledge FIH is a rising leader on the UK hotel management scene and a superb role-model for new entrants. Our in-depth interview showcases the importance of creating the right culture within the workplace that allows talent to grow and shine.

A UK government review into higher education is now underway, concerned about choice and value for money within a system where almost all institutions are charging the same price for courses. The review may mean some tourism and hospitality courses will either need to change their approaches radically or risk becoming obsolete, says John Swarbrooke of Plymouth University

Of course, a university degree is by no means the only route into a successful hospitality management career. Sue Williams FIH MI, current Hotelier of the Year, is just one of hundreds of professionals who started their careers with the Concord hotel management programme.  Celebrating its 50th anniversary, Glen Harrison MIH reveals all about this unique on-the-job training scheme which specifically targets youngsters coming out of FE colleges who do not want to go to university.

Other contents in this HQ Magazine

  • Peter Jones MBE FIH – Why has the government dropped the T level in hospitality?
  • Passion4Hospitality 2018 – re-live the excitement of our largest ever student and industry networking event
  • The end of business as usual – Angela Roper FIH on vertical disintegration in the corporate hotel industry
  • A winning partnership – how Sheffield Hallam University and Hilton are working closely together
  • Cybercrime and GDPR – what businesses need to do to protect themselves
  • Tableware trends – creativity is all the rage but weird, wacky (and unhygienic) are definitely out

 

 

Gender balanced management teams make for safer and more engaged employees, Sodexo study finds

Sodexo GenderBalanceStudyInfographic

Study of 50,000 Sodexo employees finds teams with gender diversity achieve better results across the board

International services company Sodexo has found teams managed by a balanced mix of men and women are more successful across a range of measurements including employee engagement and health and safety.

The five-year study of 70 Sodexo entities across different functions represents 50,000 managers worldwide and tested the performance implications of gender-inclusive work culture. The study examined women across all levels of management – not just upper-level leadership positions – in order to investigate the “pipeline” that will ultimately affect gender balance at the top tier of businesses.

Sodexo’s study found that non-financial factors can also significantly benefit from a more equally structured leadership, with benefits including;

Gender-balanced management reported an employee engagement rate that was 14 percentage points higher than other entities

Gender-balanced entities saw the number of accidents decrease by 12 percentage points more than other entities.

Gender-balanced entities had an average client retention rate that was 9 percentage points higher than other entities.

Gender-balanced entities had an average employee retention rate that was 8 percentage points higher than other entities

Operating margins significantly increased among more gender-balanced teams than other teams.

The pattern of results indicated that a near-equal balance of men and women in management was critical to observing gains in financial and non-financial KPIs. Once the proportion of women in management exceeded 60%, the benefits plateaued, confirming that a mix between 40% and 60% is necessary for optimal performance.

Analysts also found a direct correlation between the percentage of women in the total workforce and those in management, indicating gender-balanced workforces and leadership create an environment supportive of career growth for women. This lends support to the idea that gender parity in top leadership is closely related to the pipeline of women in the workforce.

Sodexo, already a leader in diversity & inclusion, is breaking new ground in gender parity. Today, women represent 50% of its board. Thirty-two percent of senior leadership positions are held by women globally – a 6% increase at the very top levels since 2013.

Middle management and site management positions are balanced at 46%. Currently, 59% of the total workforce works within gender-balanced management.

The Sodexo Gender Balance Study originated in 2014 with Sodexo’s desire to improve its gender parity in leadership throughout the management of its 425,000 global workforce and to expand previous outside research on gender parity in the workplace.

The full report can be accessed here: http://bit.ly/2tmBIbm

 

 

35 of UK’s Top 100 restaurant groups now loss-making – up 75% in just a year

  • Oversaturated market, minimum wage hike put pressure on restaurants
  • Another minimum wage rise just weeks away

35 of the UK’s Top 100 restaurant groups are now loss-making, up 75% from just 20 last year, shows research by UHY Hacker Young, the national accountancy group.
UHY Hacker Young says that trading conditions have become increasingly difficult for restaurant chains dealing with oversaturation in the market as well as rising costs.
The firm adds that this research comes on the back of the high-profile struggles of several major restaurant chains in recent weeks, including:

  • Jamie’s Italian, started by Jamie Oliver, which has closed 12 branches as part of a Company Voluntary Arrangement (CVA) to restructure its £71.5m debt
  • Byron, the burger chain, which may close up to 20 of its 67 branches following a period of paying reduced rent
  • Prezzo, the Italian chain, which is expected to close some of its 300 branches as part of a restructuring
  • Strada, another Italian chain, which closed 11 branches over the festive period
  • Barbecoa, another Jamie Oliver chain, which entered administration in mid-February
  • EAT, the sandwich chain, which was rumoured in early February to be considering closing some of its 100 branches

UHY Hacker Young says that pressures of competing with numerous similar ‘fast casual’ restaurants in an overcrowded high street are a major driver of many large restaurant groups registering losses over the past year.

It adds that the National Minimum wage, which has risen by an above-inflation 19% to £7.50 per hour over the last five years, has added a substantial cost burden to large restaurant chains. From April 2018, the minimum wage will rise even further to £7.83.

Peter Kubik, Partner at UHY Hacker Young, comments: “More than a third of the biggest companies in the restaurant sector are losing money, and there is little respite on the horizon.”

“Pressures on the restaurant sector have been building for years, and the last year has pushed a number of major groups to breaking point.”

“With Brexit hanging over consumers like a dark cloud, restaurants can’t expect a bailout from a surge in discretionary spending.”

“Consumers only have a finite amount of spending power when it comes to eating out, and the oversaturation of the market means that groups that fall foul of changing trends can very easily fail.”

“The Government has ratcheted up costs with a series of above-inflation rises in the minimum wage, and we are just weeks away from another 4.4% rise in April. That will be tough for a lot of restaurants to absorb.”

About UHY Hacker Young:

 The UHY Hacker Young Group is one of the UK’s Top 15 accountancy networks with 110 partners and more than 620 professional staff working from 22 locations around the country. The offices within the Group provide a wide range of accounting, tax and business advisory services, with a reputation for integrity and reliability within the financial community, and particularly with London’s Stock Markets. UHY Hacker Young are also ranked 15th in the ARL Corporate Advisers Rankings Guide amongst other UK audit firms for advising London Stock Exchange listed companies.

UHY Hacker Young is a founder member of the UHY International network with offices in every major financial centre in the world. Further information can be found at www.uhy-uk.com

 

How restaurants are reacting to Vegetarian Month

March is vegetarian month. Recent news shows that an estimated 29% of evening meals in the UK are vegetarian or vegan. These numbers only seem to be increasing, but just how is the hospitality industry reacting? Wayne Redge reports

Reports show that sales of meat-free ready meals were up by 15% in January compared to 12 months before. Vegan numbers went up from 150,000 in 2006 to 540,000 just a decade later, with 1.2 million vegetarians in addition to this in the UK. Not only that, but there has been an uprising of ‘flexitarians’, those who reduce their meat consumption by choosing to have meat-free days. As a result, evidence shows that 25% of people in Britain have cut back on how much meat they eat. With all of these figures on the rise, the transitions to a meat-free way of living aren’t just a ‘fad’.

Signs of the hospitality industry acknowledging these statistics has come with many different reactions. Nando’s, the Afro-Portuguese chain restaurant known for its chicken, has been consistently adding to its range of vegetarian and vegan options over the past few years. The spiced chicken giant has now announced that two more vegetarian dishes will be added to its menu: golden brown halloumi sticks served with a pot of sweet chilli jam dip to start, alongside a new main of Veggie Cataplana (a South African inspired stew dish.)

A host of vegetarian restaurants are also popping up, giving people who have adopted this lifestyle a lot more options. Run by former mentee of Gordon Ramsay, Minal Patel, “Prashad” is a 2 rosette and Bib Gourmand standard Indian cuisine restaurant. The personalised and crafted menu boards created by Smart Hospitality encase an all vegetarian menu that has been the talk of popular review site, Trip Advisor, since the restaurant opened its doors. Receiving the “Most Talked About Restaurant On Trip Advisor Award” and a “Certificate of Excellence” on the site, it is proof of the popularity that a vegetarian restaurant can receive by focusing its efforts towards a collective audience.

January of this year saw a mass of high-profile restaurants trying out full vegan menus or dishes for ‘Veganuary’. Harvey Nichols brought a full vegan menu to its OXO Tower restaurant in the shape of a three course vegan meal and vegan wine list. Upon opening their menu cover, guests were welcomed by the sights of Grilled Tofu with Miso and a Poached Pear and Blackberry Dessert.

tom-aitken-vegan-burger

Even Michelin Star chef, Tom Aitken took part in his Tom’s Kitchen restaurant . Teaming up with vegetarian burger company, The Vurger Co, he served up a hoisin glazed mushroom patty with pak choi, red cabbage and crunchy spring onions ( pictured above). Due to the success of this vegan burger, he has adopted a vegetarian burger to his main menu since then.

The amount of vegan festivals has seen a massive increase too, with at least 75 festivals lined up for 2018 in the UK alone. The festivals are a celebration of the natural lifestyle whilst also introducing its participants to new vegan restaurants and foods that they may not have tried before. Restaurants are creating pop ups at these events to promote themselves to the vegan following and gain some new supporters.

So, with the popularity of no-meat lifestyles on the rise, it is clear that restaurants have an opportunity to increase their offerings and enable themselves to appeal to a wider clientele. If 25% of evening meals being eaten are meat free, would restaurants do well to make 25% of their offerings meat free? It might even serve as a cost effective alternative whilst not compromising on quality.

Wayne Redge is marketing assistant, Smart Hospitality Supplies

Quotas for female managers?

On International Women’s Day (8 March), Serena von der Heyde FIH MI makes the case for affirmative action to achieve greater diversity in the boardrooms of the hospitality industry19 Serena von der Hyde FIH

Like a lot of people, I don’t like quotas – I don’t think they are fair – but recently I have started to think again. Nearly 60% of the UK workforce in our industry are women yet only just over 20% of our managers are women, and these figures have been almost static for more than 20 years.  We know that businesses with more women leaders are more successful and more profitable, so why aren’t companies rushing to develop and promote them?  The benefits of diversity are proven, but still progress in achieving diversity is glacially slow.

We want a fair workplace for our young women and men, and optimum performance for our businesses, and yet a compelling business case has failed to bring about change; then should we consider quotas?

Quotas have been shown to get results, and fast.  They have been used across Europe to promote women in politics and business since Norway started in 2003.  Many countries including Iceland, France, Spain and now Germany have followed suit, and the numbers of board-level women have risen in those countries. What’s more, there is some evidence that where quotas have been in use for some time, diversity becomes self-fulfilling. The culture and infrastructure has changed to the extent that women and men are coming through to leadership levels in equal numbers. In Belgium, the quota system states that both sexes must be represented for applications for roles in politics, and recently it is male applicants that have been hard to recruit. For quotas to work, they need to come with strict repercussions. In France, businesses were threatened with de-regulation if they failed to meet quotas. In Spain there were no sanctions for not meeting quotas, and as a result Spain has been far less successful. Quotas without teeth are ineffective.

One of the main arguments against quotas is that they prevent promotion on merit. We want the best leaders for our businesses regardless of gender. But I challenge the notion that our meritocracy is working. If it was, wouldn’t we already have more women leaders? The truth is that our societal and cultural background is failing to provide a level playing field for our aspiring women leaders.  More women than men are graduating from our universities, and, on average, women have better grade degrees, but still we overlook their talents.  It is becoming clear that we have to learn diversity – it takes time for a culture to genuinely believe in the value of diversity, and then to implement processes that nurture it.

There is a difference between quotas and targets, in terms of delivering change; quotas enforce where targets incentivise. Personally, I believe that people learn better and change more when they can set their own agenda. Every business will have different issues affecting diversity, and real change is most effective when a strategy is developed specifically by the team for that business.  When regulations are imposed, teams spend half their efforts working on strategies to sidestep the new rules, and quotas can result in alienating the team.

For my own business, where we need to develop male leaders to ensure diversity, I will be:

  • Ensuring full and ongoing commitment to diversity from the leadership
  • Leading the development of our diversity strategy and targets
  • Publishing gender pay differences, and recording gender balance across the team and our leadership team

This type of approach gives businesses time to develop a pipeline of talented women (or in our case men), so that they can make quality appointments and showcase successful women within the business. I believe that hospitality businesses should be recording gender balance, monitoring gender pay gaps and publishing their own targets and strategy for diversity.  However, if these initiatives prove inadequate, then it is time to consider resorting to the faster, but blunter tool of quotas.

Serena von der Heyde FIH MI is the owner of The Georgian House Hotel, London

Sign up to the Diversity in Hospitality, Travel and Leisure Charter here.