Passion4Hospitality 2017 paves the way to rewarding careers

We can prove it! Our unique student networking event (13 March 2017 Novotel London West) can help to boost your career prospects.

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Now in its seventh year, Passion4Hospitality provides an action-packed day of career-focused activities and networking to get hospitality students off to a flying start in industry.

One of the key activities on the day is the debating competition, which sees two university teams go head-to-head in a live battle of wits, public speaking and persuasive skills.

Participating in Passion4Hospitality can often be the start of exciting developments.

For Simrian Kur, it led to a direct contact with a BaxterStorey manager (Thomas Kilroy MIH), a company she was very interested in working for.

“A website can only tell you so much, but a person who works for the company can tell you much more about what it’s really like day-to-day,” she said.

Simrian has worked for BaxterStorey ever since taking part in the P4H 2012 student debate. Today she is the BaxterStorey restaurant manager at City law firm Herbert Smith Freehill.

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For Elsje Hugo (pictured near left), who won the debate in 2015 with her University of Derby colleagues, the experience led to lasting friendship.

She said: “We’re still very much in contact even though we are all so far from each other. The wonders of the competition built a stronger bond and friendship than we could ever have imagined.”

Today, Elsje is working as a cellar door manager at the De Grendel Wine Estate in Capetown, South Africa.

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On the Bournemouth University winning team last year, Laura Ricciotti (far left) is now working in the kitchen of the Michelin-starred Berlin restaurant Nobelhardt & Schmutzig,

Passion4Hospitality 2017 is headline-sponsored by the University Caterers Organisation (TUCO) and takes place on Monday 13 March at Novotel London West, Hammersmith.

P4H 2017 is FREE to attend. For further details click here

Institute of Hospitality at ScotHot 2017

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The Institute is delighted to be participating in ScotHot on 15 & 16 March at the SECC Glasgow. Come and visit the Institute of Hospitality stand number 4834. Here you will find out about all the activities of our Scotland Branch. We also have some specially-designed membership offers for all ScotHot delegates who are not already members of their industry professional body.

ScotHot is Scotland’s biggest food, drink, hospitality and tourism trade show. Over the two days, key buyers and decision makers from top hospitality and catering establishments networked with a wide variety of suppliers from all areas of the hospitality, tourism and catering industries.
Register now to attend ScotHot2017.

A new feature of ScotHot 2017 is The Buell Business Advice Centre which has been developed to enable owners and operators of hotels who are visiting the show to obtain free advice and guidance on matters that are impacting on their businesses.

It brings together a group of professional and advisory companies from the hotel and leisure sector which will be on hand to advise visitors to the show on a broad range of topics from Strategy to Property, Funding to Financial Management, Operations to Marketing, and Procurement to Revenue Management.  This new drop-in centre will allow owners and operators of hotels to talk to professionals and advisors on an entirely confidential basis and on virtually any subject of interest.

Through The Buell Business Advice Centre, visitors to the show have access to a one-stop-shop which will connect them with leading advisory and service providers who really understand the dynamics of the hospitality sector.

Book a free session with a business advisor at ScotHot

New book launch – Potential: find it, own it, work it by David Guile FIH

Executive Business coach, David Guile FIH, is launching his new book, POTENTIAL on 20th February 2017.potential-3d-transparent-web-res

Available on Amazon, POTENTIAL combines the principles of coaching with David’s business and leadership experience. It will support managers and emerging leaders to fulfil the potential within them and in turn the potential in others.

Specialising in leadership, David has over 25 years’ experience within the hotel sector. In POTENTIAL he draws on this, sharing his personal learning as he steadily worked his way up within the industry from a hotel trainee to CEO and Board member of Macdonald Hotels & Resorts.

In his new book, David says it’s a mistake to focus too much on trying to improve our weaknesses. Instead, fully leveraging our strengths can reap greater rewards.
Read an extract from POTENTIAL here.

“Read this book to embrace your Potential and discover what’s possible.” Alex Gregory MBE, Double Olympic Champion -­‐  coxless fours

“Filled with key leadership messages that will support, challenge and inspire you.” Robin Sheppard FIH MI. Chairman Bespoke Hotels

“This book is like having a very practical business coach with you at all times, helping you question what you’re doing and supporting you to achieve your best. David Guile draws on recognised coaching and business practices, packaging it all up into a book that is easy to read and easy to put into practice.” Anne Scoular, Co-­‐founder and faulty member of Meyler Campbell, author of The Financial Times Guide to Business Coaching.

POTENTIAL is published by Rethink Press and is available to order on Amazon here.

About the author

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As CEO for Macdonald Hotels & Resorts, the largest privately owned hotel group in the UK, from 2007 to 2014, David was responsible for over 5,000 employees and a senior executive team of twelve. Under his leadership, the company achieved successive EBITDA growth, despite the challenging economy, and was awarded the prestigious accolade of AA Hotel Group of the Year in both 2008 and 2014 in recognition of exceptional quality and customer service.

Having started as a trainee and worked his way up through all hotel departments, David rose through managerial roles before becoming CEO and Board member. In addition he has experience in both large PLCs (Forte Hotels Group, Granada and Compass) and privately owned businesses (Macdonald Hotels & Resorts). He has an exceptional range of commercial and people experience that supports the leadership development he can offer as an Executive Coach.

David completed an MBA in 2001 at Oxford Brookes University, specialising in hospitality and people management, and is a graduate of The Meyler Campbell Business School of Coaching, the leading Executive Coach training programme in the UK and credited by the Worldwide Association of Business Coaches.

As well as holding Non-­‐Executive roles, David is also a trustee of the hospitality-­‐based charity Room to Reward, recognising hidden heroes within the charity sector by rewarding them with hotel breaks.     He has also been involved with the charity Daisy’s Dream, supporting bereaved children and their  families, for over twenty   years.

More information : www.davidguile.com.
Contact: david@davidguile.com

 

“We want people from everywhere”

brexitAn important ingredient of the UK hospitality industry’s success has been relatively little interference from government, writes Derek Taylor OBE FIH. Brexit could change that.

Italo Zangiacomi was the manager of the Piccadilly Hotel in London. Hector Zavatoni was the banqueting manager at the Savoy. Cesare Maggi was the restaurant manager at the Ritz. They were among the 470 Italians who died when the Arandora Star, taking them to internment in Canada in July 1940, was torpedoed in the Atlantic.

The cream of the British hotel industry perished in that disaster 77 years ago; eight hundred and sixty five in all lost their lives and only thirteen bodies have ever been recovered. There is an annual mass at St. Peter’s Italian Church in Clerkenwell every July to remember the calamity and in 2010 a memorial cloister garden was opened at St. Andrews Roman Catholic Church in Glasgow. There are other memorials too.

Italy was an Axis power, but even so, the reputation of their hotel and restaurant staff was so good that top banqueting managers in the 1960s were still expected to be Italian. When the Welshman, Bryan Evans, was appointed banqueting manager at the Savoy, the chair of the company and future Lord Mayor of London, Sir Hugh Wontner, insisted that he be known as Evangelo Brioni.

We owe a great deal to a large number of foreigners who embellished our industry. We certainly don’t want the government to now inflict some petty chauvinist restriction on our great multi-cultural hotel and restaurant world. We want to take anybody from anywhere who can do the job well.

You’ve seen ice work, butter work and sugar work. Who invented it? George IV’s chef, Marie-Antoine Carême, can take a lot of the credit.  Carême came over from France after Waterloo and set standards never seen before.  We have great traditions as an international industry. It is right to remember another Frenchman, Alexis Soyer, from the Reform Club, who died in the Crimea feeding the troops in the War against Russia. Or where would we have got à la carte from, if Auguste Escoffier hadn’t come up with the idea with Cesar Ritz at the Carlton. The language in top kitchens in 1945 was still French. Bedroom lighting owes a great deal to Ritz. In fairness, excellent British hotel marketing was home-grown.

Ever since the Second World War, the hotel and restaurant industry in this country has steadily progressed. At exactly the same time traditional industries – ship building, coal mining, steel manufacturing – have gone down the drain. So to what can we attribute our success? Well, almost total neglect by successive governments has been an enormous help. Admittedly, they picked us out for special taxation in the 1960s because we weren’t making anything. Agreed, they nearly bankrupted us with the Grant Scheme in the early 1970s, but overall they have let us get on with it and we have flourished. Now they are threatening to interfere again.

There is a question mark over whether we should welcome overseas immigrants after Brexit.

Well, let me tell you one thing. If you were going to deport everybody with a foreign ancestor from this country, there’d be hardly anybody left. The Britons were shoved out of the East side of the country by the Anglo-Saxons in the 8th century. You’ll still find some in Cornwall, but not in Devon.

We are all foreigners – Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Normans, Flemings, Huguenots, Poles and many others. Only the Vikings went home. Immigrants are usually the pick of the crop. Even the prime minister’s family benefited from being allowed to emigrate. In the 16th century, her ancestor, John Spooner, emigrated to Holland and died there.

Bring it up to date. Only 50 years ago we weren’t in the Common Market and the British hotel world was desperate for staff. Brian Worthington, one of our best human resources directors, went down on his knees at the Home Office and begged them to let him bring in the staff we needed from – the Phillipines. Having assured themselves that our natives wouldn’t work in the industry, the Home Office acquiesced.

It’s no use  people saying that if the people from overseas are shut out the British will do the jobs. The only way in which the industry has kept up its standards of service is by recruiting from everywhere. Because of international influences, we are better cooks – we get Michelin stars now – and better managers. Admittedly, we are brilliant entrepreneurs, housekeepers, hall porters and barmen. We have one problem; how many parents hope that when their children grow up, they will be restaurant managers and chefs? They do in Switzerland, Italy and France.

I once asked Lord Forte, a great hotelier, why the British didn’t cook as well as the continentals. He explained: “It’s not part of the culture. In Britain we – we garden.”  And so we do – better than anybody else in the world. We also cook pretty well now – but foreigners laid down the ground rules and there is more we can do to improve many aspects of our business.

Dear Mrs. May, you have a whole string of problems at the moment. Why don’t you continue to let us get on with it. Our damp island is fifth in the world tourist rankings. We do a lot better than the football team. Please continue the traditional government policy of leaving us alone.

Derek Taylor OBE FIH is an internationally-renowned expert on hotel marketing. His eighth book Revolutionary Hotel Marketing is published by the Institute of Hospitality and available from Amazon

New research into wine ordering

eurochrie-research-winnerThe winners of the Institute of Hospitality Education Research Award 2016 at last year’s EuroCHRIE conference in Budapest were Henri Kuokkanen MIH  (pictured right) and Carlos da Silva MIH for their research into the future of wine ordering in restaurants

Wine can be a source of great pleasure. Yet consumers may perceive selecting wine a risk, and particularly in restaurants the choice can create stress. The solid reputation of a restaurant eases such concerns when patrons can seek advice from expert staff. When combined perfectly with food, wine elevates a meal experience to a new level. Thus wine selection is an essential component of customer experience, and the assistance a restaurant offers is critical.

A wine steward, or sommelier, acts as a facilitator in wine purchases by providing sensory descriptions of wines. While a sommelier directly boosts wine sales, he or she also indirectly augments wine revenue through better staff training. Customers generally perceive extended interaction with staff positively, generating further benefits from hiring a sommelier.

Employing trained sommeliers inevitably increases costs. In an attempt to enhance customer experience without this cost, some restaurants have replaced traditional paper wine lists with electronic tablets.

Tablets as food menus show promise in enhancing the service experience of a customer by providing extended information, but the potential of combining food and wine orders on tablets has yet to be tested. Tablets are beneficial when customers perceive value in them, and wine suggestions may be included in these tools. Restaurant revenue management may also benefit from the use of technology. However, the special role of wine in creating a dining experience calls for extra attention to how wine itself is presented; it should not merely be treated as a sub-component of the food menu.

To read more (the article The Wine Tablet Experience in the current issue of HQ Magazine, the Institute of Hospitality official publication), click here
For the full research paper, please contact Henri Kuokkanen MIH, research and education, Switzerland, email: henri.kuokkanen@gmail.com

David Nuttall FIH reappointed to ACMSF

maxresdefaultOur congratulations go to David Nuttall FIH who has been reappointed to the Government’s Advisory Committee on the Microbiological Safety of Food (ACMSF).

With more than 30 years in the catering industry, Nuttall has a wealth of experience in the application of food safety, and has previously lectured students on food safety. He holds masters degrees in food safety and business administration, and spent time as an executive head chef at Bradford University before joining the Harper Adams University in 2005.

Nuttall, whose initial appointment was in 2010, will now be part of the ACMSF until March 2020. He said: “It is a great honour to be a member of the ACMSF. I’m very pleased to offer my experience to the application of the microbiological safety of food in the UK.”

Nuttall has made valuable contributions to reports on the microbiological risk from shell eggs and their products, and is currently on the ad hoc group on campylobacter.

David is a non-executive director of The University Caterers Organisation (TUCO) and has been a Fellow of the Institute of Hospitality since 2012.

Harper Adams University achieved Hospitality Assured status in 2012 and was a winner at the Hospitality Assured Awards in 2015.

David represents foodservice on the ACMSF committee and would welcome hearing industry views. Contact: dnuttall@harper-adams.ac.uk

New Fellows celebrate at the Landmark London Hotel

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New Fellows of the Institute of Hospitality celebrated during a glittering black-tie evening of fine food, wine and quality networking at the Landmark London Hotel in glamorous Marylebone. The Institute of Hospitality Fellows’ Dinner took place last night (6 February).

Congratulations go to Daniel Healey FIH, Neil Shorthouse FIH, Martyn Westcott-Wreford FIH and Matthew White FIH as we warmly welcome them into Fellowship.

Pictured left to right are:
Alastair Storey FIH, President
Stephen Kyjak-Lane FIH, Chairman
Daniel Healey FIH, The Bloomsbury, Deputy General Manager
Neil Shorthouse FIH, Hospitality Cruise International, Managing Director
Martyn Westcott-Wreford FIH, Institution of Engineering & Technology, Operations Manager
Matthew White FIH, TUCO, Chairman
Peter Ducker FIH, Chief Executive